FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1483 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1174 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 67 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 318 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 124 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 69 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 24 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 15 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 4 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

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Spin launches a new portfolio

The London design studio Spin , renowned for their clear & elegant design solutions, have updated their website. Packed with consistent product shots of old and new work and apparently some previously unseen Unit Editions Books. The responsive website makes use of some lovely subtle features like scrolling through images on mouse-over and a visible breadcrumb trail that opens up a sidebar menu.




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Comic Sans for Cancer

Comic Sans for Cancer is an exhibition of posters inspired by the 20th anniversary of Comic Sans (the font we all love to hate) with proceeds going to Cancer Research UK.

We caught up with the exhibition’s curators Chris Flack, Renee Quigley and Jenny Theolin to find out what the hell they were thinking.

Why Comic Sans? For the love of God, why?! Please explain yourselves. We are sorry… I’m sure you wished it was ‘Helvetica against Hernias’ or ‘Gotham for Gonorrhea’  but alas that would probably be to easy. This was meant to be a challenge. If a designer can make Comic Sans look good then they can do anything.

Seriously we noticed that no one was celebrating the 20th anniversary of Comic Sans. Everyone had celebrated Helvetica’s 50th birthday but on one seemed to be celebrate the most ‘talked about font in the world’ 20th birthday.  

As designers & friends we wanted to do a project with a difference – which is how Comic Sans for Cancer started. We all know people who have been affected by cancer, so we decided we wanted to do something that was fun and quirky to raise money for Cancer research while at the same time celebrate the 20th year of Comic Sans. 

Everyone love to hate Comic Sans. So why not take the font the everyone loves to hate and put it to good use. As a designer I despise Comic Sans and thats the fun of it. Using something that’s perceived as being a little bit unloved for good and plus “Comic Sans for Cancer” just has a good ring to it. 

We really wanted the project to be fun and not take itself too seriously. “This may be the first time we publicly admit to having used Comic Sans. We apologise in advance to the design gods for the design sins we are about to commit. Please have mercy on our souls.”

9 out of ten people have heard of Comic Sans. So there is a lot of public interest in it and everyone seems to have a view or it (good or bad). As Vincent Connare said “If you love it, you don’t know much about typography and if you hate it, you really don’t know much about typography, either”.

And it feels like its the right time for Comic Sans to make its come back. and we thought it would be quite fun to have Vincent Connare and Ban Comic Sans posters in the same room.

You’ve had over 500 submissions. Was it difficult creating a shortlist to exhibit? How did you chose? (surely they all look awful!?)

It was one of the hardest shortlist to ever make, since all the entries were worthy to be in the exhibition. We’ve tried to create a selection that will turn heads, evoke debate, make us laugh and/or are also just pretty to look at. We spent an afternoon going through each entry on a projector, and if the submission got 2+ votes, it went through to the next round. Bit like Designer X-Factor. Can’t wait for everyone to see them all!

Can you tell us about the show? What can we expect? You know the ‘guy’ nobody likes but everyone knows throws a killer party? Comic Sans is this guy. Without giving much away, we are celebrating a birthday here remember, so expect the best birthday party in the arts community. 

There will be a huge selection of both heartfelt/serious and humorous/silly posters – ensuring there’s something for everyone. Expect giant installations, ironic little things, and of course the proof of the blood, sweat and tears from the artists who designed against their morals to raise money for Cancer Research Uk.

Anything you’d like to add? Come with an open mind, designers sold their souls for this for a good cause There are few chances in the design community to come together, have a bit of fun and raise money. This was a fairly open brief and we can’t wait to see everyones reactions to this truly global selection of work. Come along, have a laugh, donate, and spread the word.

Exhibition is at The Proud Archivist from Aug 20th – 24th 2014. A limited number of posters will be available to purchase at the exhibition and online.



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Christophe Thockler – Lusine

Needlework and music videos aren’t two words you’d often see in the same sentence, however as we showed last year Nancy-based director and designer Christophe Thockler can find beauty and drama in the mundane.

Christophe has been in touch again, this time presenting his new music video for Seattle-based electro ambient artist called Lusine. Created for the single Arterial released on Ghostly International, Lusine wanted something blood related. Christophe took that fairly open brief and created something he calls “electrorganic” mixing computer chips, leds, screens, to emphasize the cold sounds, and blood to represent the more delicate warm layers of sound.

The final stop motion video was created using 7,000 photos, 15kg of electrical components from old tvs, phones and computers, 5 litres of blood. Christophe wanted to make something 100% real deciding to employ no digital effects in the making of the video – even the end credits are done with a glitching computer.



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Bardo

Melbourne-based Bardo have been in touch to share some of their recent projects. Run by directors Luis Vialeand and Brenda Imboden, in collaboration with a close-nit network of freelancers, the studio has been producing some lovely work, such as branding for artisan meat company Zamora, and an installation for Polar illustrating climate change’s affects on the arctic poles.



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D&AD Next Director Award

Today D&AD are announcing the first shortlist for the Next Director Award – a brand new short film award in partnership with YouTube.

16 aspiring filmmakers are in the running for the first award, which follows a different format and exists separately to the D&AD Professional Awards. It is judged three times per year, producing three separate shortlists, which are then in contention for the overall prize. The overall winner will announced at the Professional Awards Ceremony in May 2015. Are you an aspiring film-maker? Then the entry deadline for the second shortlist will be October 15.

Alison Lomax, Head of Creative Agency Partnerships, YouTube commented,

“I was blown away by the high level talent and variety of films across branded content, music videos and documentaries. A true reflection of the calibre of this next generation of filmmakers on YouTube.”

The first shortlist has a really nice mix of films; everything from animation, to documentaries to music videos and commercials, selected by a panel of top directors including Dougal Wilson, David Bruno, Laura Gregory, Ringan Ledwige, and Juliette Larthe.

We’ve selected some of our favourites below, you can view the entire shortlist here.

Walking Contest, a short film directed by Vania Heymann

Mr Flash: ‘Midnight Blue’, a music video directed by PENSACOLA

GAWDS, a documentary directed by Christine Yuan

Living Moments, branded content directed by Paul Trillo



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Graphic Design Festival Scotland (GDFS)

Graphic Design Festival Scotland (GDFS) is an all new programme of workshops, competitions, talks, exhibitions, urban murals and live stream discussions, taking place between 22nd-26th of October with exhibitions running before, after and throughout.

Created and organised by Beth Wilson and James Gilchrist of Glasgow based Warriors Studio, the events are participation-based and aim to inspire young designers through active engagement. Our goal is to promote networking, creativity, learning, collaboration, friendly competition and importantly, to have fun.

The workshops will be centred around creative processes; conceptual thinking, visual communication and professional practice. We want to offer opportunities to develop creative problem solving skills and challenge ways of thinking through design-based projects and conceptual arts. There is an impressive list of workshop leaders and competition mentors on board including the likes of Anthony Burrill, Hort, Kesselskramer, Design Büro Frankfurt, 44 Flavours, Freytag Anderson, OK-RM, Recoat, Risotto Studio, Graphical HouseTouch, MadeBrave and O-Street.

If that wasn’t enough they are also running the GDFS International Poster Competition to encourage people to showcase and celebrate a broad selection of poster design from across the world, with a selection of entrants being exhibited during the festival at ‘In Public Gallery’ – Glasgow, Scotland. For submission details visit here.

Full a full list of programme events, poster competition information and how you can get involved visit the GDFS site or follow announcements and updates @GDFScotland



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Webydo Launches Its Code-Free Parallax Scrolling Animator

Parallax scrolling has been making headlines in our industry for a couple of years now. Even big influencers have made advances in parallax scrolling animator, one of the most impressive and original of these being Webydo, which has recently added the Parallax Scrolling Animator to its code-free design suite. Readers of FFF can be among the first to create a parallax scrolling site with Webydo’s code-free design studio. Simply head over to Webydo and sign up for an account so that you too can create a code-free parallax site.

Once you sign up for Webydo’s invitation, make sure that you read through the tips below for parallax scrolling so that you can properly implement the maximum effect for the most impact.

What is Parallax Scrolling?

Parallax scrolling has been around since the 1980s in 2D video games when the forefront graphics moved at a different speed than the background. In web design, parallax scrolling works a lot like video games in that different elements on the page move at different speeds. This creates a 3D effect and adds depth and interest to a website.

The problem now is that parallax scrolling has been both overdone and done badly, which means that some designers are shying away from the effect. And often, parallax sites include issues in site speed, mobile use, SEO, and usability. With these considerations in mind, has the parallax scrolling trend run its course?

Actually, many would argue that parallax is here to stay, rather than just a passing fad. As with most trends, there are solutions to the problems it initially has shown, as Zack Rutherford points out in his UX Magazine article. Parallax can provide a useful tool in creating ”wow factor” and allowing designers to stretch their legs creatively. Webydo made parallax available to its users exactly for these reasons.

How can Parallax boost professional website design?

Let’s face it – parallax scrolling just looks cool. It keeps users engaged, provides an interactive feel to a design, and overall keeps visitors on a page longer, which in turn can increase conversions.

Unleashed Technologies describes parallax scrolling as a technique that takes “the user experience to a new interactive level of online viewing.” Used in a story-like layout, parallax is a solution for web designers in creating websites that are more appealing to visitors.

Examples of Parallax.

The Sony store website shows just how creative you can get with parallax scrolling. When you create a parallax scrolling site with Webydo’s professional design studio, keep in mind the techniques used on the Sony Be Moved page. It begins with an introduction to the story of their company, and as viewers scroll down through the site, the story unfolds via parallax.

While scrolling, the parts of a Sony product “float” together to show how the technology came to be. The interesting part is that one funky part is thrown in, such as the lollipop mixed in with the parts that make up Sony’s mobile phone camera lens attachment. Users can click the + button to read interesting tidbits. It’s little extras like these that really make a site unique.

Site speed and mobile problems.

Two negatives of parallax involve mobile compatibility and site speed. Fortunately, Webydo’s parallax animator is optimized for quick load speed and mobile compatibility, so users don’t have to worry about these aspects.

And Sony shows another way that designers can further speed up a website: it does not try to keep all of the content on a single page. Its menu at the top of the page leads to product pages, an easy aspect Webydo users can also implement.

SEO and usability problems.

Two more complaints of parallax scrolling designs are poor SEO and usability. SEO problems are usually due to designers simply leaving this consideration out of a design, which is why Webydo makes it easy to include important SEO factors like meta-tags.

To avoid usability issues, simply use Webydo’s advanced design suite to add in factors such as chapter buttons. Sony kept the buttons inconspicuous – descriptions only pop open when users hover the mouse over each chapter button.

Is it just a fad or here to stay?

The difference between a fad and trend is that a fad passes quickly but a trend remains for more than just a season. Parallax Scrolling has been in web design for a while now, which is a good indicator that it’s here to stay.

It is true that parallax is an intimidating design style to learn, especially with no code experience. But this is why so many designers are taking up the chance to create their clients websites with Webydo’s code-free parallax scrolling animator. One designer even created a Game of Thrones teaser site for “Death Is Coming”. Now the possibilities are limitless, so you can create your site today with Webydo and join the growing community of 95K professional designers around the world who designing with Webydo.

This article is presented by Webydo’s community of professional designers.




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The Lion City – Time-Laps & Tilt-Shift Film

Tilt-shift photography is always great fun to look at, with the resulting toy-like-feeling giving a fresh perspective to the subject.

Over the last couple of years we’ve begun seeing some tilt-shift in motion with, beautiful time-lapse films of New York, Melbourne and Singapore. Although all three are impressive it’s the latter which really blew us away.

Shot by tilt-shift specialist Keith Loutit, the film uses an innovative post-production technique which we feel sets it apart from the competition.

Speaking with Planet5d, Keith explains:

“Because its the first time I’ve released in this style, the film is hard hitting, and full of effects… more so than if I were releasing a story based concept. Many of the scenes are not really tilt shift.. they’re what I call ‘clean shocks’, or ’tilt shocks’, depending on whether I choose to keep the tilt shift effect, and these are the focus of most of my experiments now going forward.”

However The Lion City was produced, the end result is visually stunning must-see look at Singapore.



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FFFootball – Simon Mooney Interview

A pretty amazing World Cup is just about to draw to a close, so therefore we are coming to the end of our FFFootball posts.

But before we do, we managed to catch up with photographer Simon Mooney. Simon has shot many different subjects over the years, but football has remained at the centre of his work. He has been behind the scenes with the England squad, shot campaigns and documentary shots for Spurs and Fulham, as well as shooting for the likes of Umbro and The Sun. So we thought he was the ideal photographer to have a football based chat with. So we did, and we found it really interesting.

Hi Simon. As you might be aware, we’ve been featuring a lot of World Cup and football posts on FormFiftyFive recently. Obviously your portfolio of work isn’t just related to football and sports, but it is a subject you’ve shot a lot of. So how did you end up shooting this subject matter?

I’ve always played football and been fascinated by certain aspects of the game. In the early 90s I was an art director in a Leeds advertising agency just starting to take pictures. I love newspapers and particularly admired David Ashdown’s sports pictures in The Independent – they really inspired me but getting a Premier league license is difficult so I learned to shoot sport at my own amateur club – Overthorpe SC in West Yorkshire – on crutches as I recovered from a ruptured cruciate ligament.

“Rio Ferdinand in the hotel massage room on the morning of the quarter-final against Brazil. It was the first game I got pictures from the dressing room.”

Read more




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Model mother tongue: Ola Rudnicka

“I hear hissing, rustling and hushing, and my ears are bleeding…” ~ Oscar Wilde on Polish language

Oscar wasn’t a fan of Polish, but then he didn’t have model Ola Rudnicka teaching him the finer points of the language. This beautifully shot video for ID Magazine with art direction from Robert Serek (who has created sets for Chanel and Stella McCartney) sees Ola – with mother tongue firmly in cheek – teach us handy phrases such as “W Szczebrzeszynie chrzaszcz brzmi w trzcinie” – A bug is buzzing in the reeds.

With art direction from Robert Serek, who has created sets for Chanel and Stella McCartney, the icy blue-toned video sees Ola enunciate key phrases in Polish amidst a stark white graphic set.

Check it out.



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Paula Scher Launches First Online Design Class

Yesterday online learning community Skillshare launched an online design class with Pentagram partner Paula Scher.

Known for her award-winning work designing brand identities for organizations like The Public Theater, Citibank, The Museum of Modern Art and The Philadelphia Museum of Art, her first online class is entitled Brand Identity: Design Adaptable Branding Systems.

The 70 minute class is broken into 10 lessons, where students will research an organization’s goals, develop a series of design solutions, simplify them to their essence, and stretch them to their limits across animation, products, signage, architecture, and more. Scher hopes her class will inspire designers at all levels, all around the world, to think creatively about brand identity.

Enrolment for the class is now open at Skillshare. A free one week trial is available to try out the lessons, thereafter it’s $10 per month for access to all of Skillshare’s classes, which cover design, film & video, photography and fashion.



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Stunning design and simply lines. Great stuff.

Jai @ DeFrae on Gomez by Savvy Studio

love the illustrations

Jenny Ure on Jane Laurie

Leo on LEGO: Everything is NOT awesome

Nice book. Is this available for I-pad. Please inform?

Graphic Dig on Graphic Design: A User’s Manual—Book Review

Pretty poor attempt at linkbaiting.

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Chingón! Great work!

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