FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1511 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1178 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 76 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 320 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 125 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 70 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 25 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 16 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 4 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

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Interviews

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15 reasons to visit the OFFF 2015

In preparation for next years 15th Anniversary of the OFFFest in Barcelona we are giving you no less than 15 great reasons to book your tickets and a flight to sunny Spain.

1. Watch Signalnoise (James White) opening the Main Titles for the first time in his career for OFFF Barcelona 2015.

2. Get your hands on the OFFF 15th Anniversary limited edition book by http://www.vasava.es/.

3. Take a walk around Barcelona’s gothic quarter.

4. Be the first to hear about exclusive projects announcements by featured speakers like Territory studio, GMUNK and more!

5. Experience Joshua Davis exclusive chill-out project and float in The Deepest of Space.

6. Help Michael Cina Re-Brand OFFF.

7. Watch the sunset from Guell Park.

8. Make Your Own Robot with Jan De Coster.

9. Discover with Renascent the Evolution of Copying in an awesome workshop.

10. Enjoy a drink and one hell of a view from the Silken Diagonal Hotel rooftop.

11. Create circles out of Abstract Shapes with Rik Oostenbroek.

12. Eat some Tapas in Barceloneta. We can recommend L’Ostia.

13. Watch featured artist SNASK “special performance that will blow everyone’s mind OFFF”

14. Explore the OFFF Market Street where loads of great designers and makers sell their wares.

15. Hire a bike and ride off your OFFF closing-party hangover

There you go. If that doesn’t convince you, nothing will! Get your tickets now.





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Mice, Ants, and the Lazy Dog

FontFont teamed up with award-winning Berlin based film production company Stark Films to launch their new and improved Web FontFonts — now including OpenType layout features that have been stuck in desktop publishing software for years.

1,600+ of their fonts are now supported by all browsers (apart from Safari), setting free the magic of ligatures, stylistic alternates, figure sets, fractions, small caps  swashes.

Focusing the film around the renowned typographic phrase ‘The Quick Brown Fox Jumps Over The Lazy Dog’ the Stark Film team created a series of scenes using different FontFont typefaces to recreate the attributes of OpenType. From magnets, ants, a mice maze, to laser cut letters, the film takes you on a typographic journey through the aspects of next-level web typography.

“Putting across the features of OpenType to those outside of the industry, and many within it, can often be complicated and confusing, so we wanted to work with a team who were not connected to the world of typography and who could bring these features to life in an imaginative and ingenious manner.” Head of the FontFont Marketing Team, Ivo Gabrowitsch

Check their swish microsite to see the features in action. Don’t forget, no Safari…





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Dutchscot: Hungry worms

We always love discovering exciting new studios, and we were chuffed when Ross got in touch about Dutchscot, a brand-spanking studio set up by Jacob Vanderkar and Ross Goulden (formerly of GBH).

We caught up with Ross about the studio, and their latest project, ‘Hungry Worms’– a social book sharing initiative for those living with dementia.

“Being at home suffering from the widespread condition can be a pretty lonely experience so reading and getting absorbed by a good book is something that ends up being really important. Hungry Worms also helps raise awareness of the ever increasing condition by connecting those living with dementia directly to people in the local community in a meaningful way.”

“Book donations are made by the public at sharing hubs in a number of local coffee shops in London and the number is growing every month. Hungry Worms then uses existing networks of carers to bring donated books into peoples homes. Books are returned and borrowed again and it’s that journey of a book that was important to highlight.”

“Readers’ first experience of Hungry Worms is to get their own bookmark, featuring a series of characters representing all of the broad genres, such as comedy, thriller or a good old tear jerker.”

“The logotype represents a title of a book or a chapter heading and all typography is set in Plantin, the classic book typeface. The journey of the book is reinforced with a hole punch, each hole representing a reader.”

— Lovely stuff guys! Best of luck with the new venture – one to keep an eye on for sure!



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Interview – La Tortilleria

La Tortillería is a creative company based in Monterrey, Mexico, with a passion for images and words with the exceptional ability of turning them into an exquisite reflection of an idea. Their forte is editorial design, but have a wide range of projects. On this interview Zita Arcq talks about the studio, the background, their process and projects.

1. First of all, can you tell us about the studio and the team behind La Tortillería?

La Tortillería started as two freelance graphic designers renting a space to do art and design work. The space was an old tortilla factory on San Pedro’s downtown, therefore the name. It was almost as if we didn’t decided it, we just called it that way when we said we were going to the studio, to go to “la tortillería” or the tortilla factory.

We started designing two magazines, it was a constant project, and every now and then we had other projects.

Eleven years later we’re a team of designers, copywriters, illustrators and photographers. We focus on combining design and functionality. And we design for others, not just to ourselves.

Read more





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From Form for Willem de Kooning

Remember art school? Beer, lectures, procrastination, inspiration, late nights in the studio, pure creative freedom…

Dutch film and design trio From Form nailed the highs and lows of student life in a recent short for Rotterdam-based art academy Willem de Kooning. Briefed to create an online commercial that would motivate new students, From Form’s Jurjen Versteeg, Ashley Govers and Wouter Keijzer took a “lean and mean” approach with a punchy narrative and fresh, colourful set design. Whether you’re looking for inspiration or just fancy a quick trip back to your uni days, it’s worth a look.

“We’re following the creative process of a design student – from excitedly starting a project to postponing it a few days later, insecurities, working late, failing and starting over,” explains Versteeg. “The guiding voiceover in the film doubles as a role of a mentor and the students creative consciousness.”

The art academy hosts a variety of different courses, so the film needed to be as broad as possible. By focusing on the bare essentials of each course and cutting out any additional clutter, FromForm were able to highlight the complete spectrum of courses – from graphic design to fashion, digital programming, illustration and more – without diluting the overall message of motivation.

To capture the table-top shot running throughout the piece, the studio built a DIY rigging system hanging from the ceiling. The trio then shot the piece in two days on a Canon 5D Mark III with Magic Lantern (“So we could get the full raw potential of the camera”).

Their favourite part of the project? “We’re really happy how the final edit turned out,” says Versteeg. “But it’s always fun to smash a laptop when you get the chance!”



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Hello I am Erik

We probably don’t have to tell you that Erik Spiekermann is one of the best-known graphic designers in the world. He not only represents German typeface and corporate design like no other, but his work and the companies he has founded have had an huge influence on contemporary graphic design and probably most of our readers as designers. The visual biography Hello, I am Erik is the first comprehensive exploration of Erik’s career, his body of work, and his mindset.

The book includes an impressive list of contributions by Michael Bierut, Neville Brody, Mirko Borsche, Wally Olins, Stefan Sagmeister, Christian Schwartz, Erik van Blokland, and many others.

“The ability to reduce complex ideas to unforgettably simple forms is a remarkable gift. Erik can do it with typefaces, or images, or words and – seemingly – in any language. That is the mark of a great designer, and that is what Erik Spiekermann is.”

Michael Beirut

The book is available directly from Gestalten Books and comes highly recommended by the FFF team!




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Rifle: Makeshift Magazine

Makeshift is part of a new breed of magazines passionate about their content, form, and community. A field guide to hidden creativity if you like. From homemade aircraft in Nigeria, drug smugglers in Mexico to Haitian communities pushing back against marginalisation, Makeshift uncovers creative solutions from the economic fringe.

Graphic design studio Rifle designed the magazine when it was launched in 2011 and now had the challenge or re-working their own designs to give Makeshift a new look and feel. Looks like they’ve done a damn fine job!



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Studio Series #2 – The Bakery

Roll up, roll up, it’s time for the second of our new Studio Series insights! This week we’re travelling to the capital of Russia, Moscow! for an insight into one of the countries most exciting up and coming studios, The Bakery!

We got on our imaginary EasyJet flight (also known as GMail) to chat to Ivan from the studio about why they do what they do, and what’s going on in Russia these days…

- – – – – -

How did the Bakery come together?

I was about to find a job in Moscow, but was feeling uninspired by the interviews I was going through. I didn’t feel any relation to their creative output and thought they were lagging behind.

Anna (my partner & wife) suggested we’d try to go on our own and establish a practice with different attitude towards work and studio culture. We wanted to do contemporary stuff, try new things, work with materials and print — things that are still not that popular in Russia.

Did you both have a bit of business knowledge before setting thing up?

We thought we did :) From what we’ve experienced at previous jobs we had some basic knowledge of how a studio operates, but when we started we had to sort lots of legal stuff, find a space, set up accounts and all of this was completely new to us. We also had to manage clients ourselves, take care of billing and payments, etc. There are lots of things I’d have done differently if I had the knowledge I have now.

How do you two split the business side against the creative side?

Luckily there are two of us, so Anna manages the business side, while I manage things related to design and we also contribute to each other’s duties. But still there are routine tasks I have to carry out on my own and they take a lot of time, so I try to work from home, either at breakfast or before I go to bed.

Read more



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Chatter

Beautiful work.

ALEX GREEN on Tom Haugomat

williamcolley – Id take a punt on ITC Clearface

Simon Hodgkinson on Rifle: Makeshift Magazine

Anybody know what typeface they use for “Makeshift”?

williamcolley on Rifle: Makeshift Magazine

Brilliant!!

Lone Bru Kjær on F-Bombs for Feminism

Ordered! Looks beautiful!

Jamie Smith on The Recorder: Issue 1

Can’t wait to get my hands on this first issue of The Recorder by Luke Tonge. Looks amazing. A real keeper and collectable. Be sure to get a copy before first edition runs out.

Marksteen Adamson on The Recorder: Issue 1

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