FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1495 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1175 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 66 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 318 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 124 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 69 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 24 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 15 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 4 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

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Luke Tonge

Luke Tonge

Graphic Designer – Birmingham, UK

https://twitter.com/luketonge


Posts by Luke Tonge:

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Glug Birmingham: Midland Masters

With just under a week to go, momentum is building for the first outing of Glug Birmingham on Thursday 21st August. Titled MIDLAND MASTERS, an event curated by Created in Birmingham and Inkygoodness, in association with (the newly rebranded) Glug, is hosted at Fazeley Studios. Riso print programmes for the night have been printed by Hato Press, the poster inside designed by headline speaker Alex Fowkes, with the programme itself designed by Kerry Leslie. We’re looking forward to being there, it promises to be a great night!

The speakers:

PROVIDE (Matt Nation) Starting from the bottom (and we’ll probably be here a while) Hero of Switzerland & FRUKT (Dan Button) Doing a Hobby for a Living Waste Studio (Norm Hayes) Apple P Cuppa Tea Studio Output (Alun Edwards & Chris Allwood) New Challenges Well Made Studio (Gemma Germains) No Friends in Business Alex Fowkes Process is Just as Important as Product

Nine stalls in our pop-up market: Codswallop Collective (Art prints), Brothers of the Stripe (Prints & originals), Working Clasp (Jewellery), Mike Stimpson (Photography), Hero of Switzerland (Art prints), LizzLizz (Comics), PROVIDE (Clothing & Accessories), Bethany Thompson (Art prints), Sam Pierpoint (Handpainted shoes).

Live drawing from Brothers of the Stripe, taking place in the Fazeley Studios courtyard (where you’ll find the BBQ too). Live t-shirt silk-screen printing from Waste Studio. AMMO Magazine special edition launch party. FREE screen print, designed by Alex Fowkes, printed by Whiteduck Screenprint (for the first 100 guests to sign in!) as well as tasty treats from Paisley Immy.

All of this will be taking place at Fazeley Studios, 6pm-11pm. To finish, there’s an after-party at Spot*Light, 10pm-1am.

Tickets are available on eventbrite, priced £7.50 (+ free drink)

A further two events are planned for 20th November (Illustration – speakers include Studio Binky and Florence Blanchard) and 12th March (Digital / Innovation – speakers include Gavin Strange and Jonny Costello).



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The Office of Craig Oldham: Interview

I caught up with Craig Oldham to discuss his recent work for D&AD‘s New Blood Awards, which draws together the organisation’s previous Student Awards, Graduate Academy, and New Blood Exhibition, aiming to create a simpler structure that encourages more young people to enter the scheme.  You can see some his picks from the 700+ portfolios represented here.

A series of infographics were created, on which Craig worked with copywriter and collaborating creative director John Goddard. Speaking to Creative Review, Craig explained – “Once we’d got the main content plotted out, we realised just how massive the whole thing was, which was when we started to get excited about it – I think at the back of our minds we wanted to create the world’s biggest flow-chart. The whole point of a flow diagram is that you can use it to illustrate anything. You can diverge, and branch off. There are no limits to what you can do with it, which is as much of a curse as it is blessing,”

You’re a vocal advocate of D&AD and design education in general, whats your history and current relationship with D&AD? 

I’ve been involved with D&AD in many capacities throughout the years. I exhibited in the New Blood exhibition when I graduated, I went to an agency where Ben Casey was involved in D&AD and where getting in-book was a major deal in the awards season, and from those early beginnings I’ve done pretty much everything they’ve ever asked of me—but not because of anything more than a shared belief. I was always aware of the awards—as everyone is—but they invest all that back into education and that’s what I believe in, and what has kept my relationship with them for all these years. Education is what matters to me. It can be the most rewarding and powerful thing you can share. And D&AD and I share that value system.

I was at the wrap of the New Blood Academy last week (where graduates in the New Blood Programme get a 2 week ‘bootcamp’ effectively), and speaking to the graduates involved and how much better and optimistic they feel on trying to get a first foothold in the industry than before is really powerful stuff.

When I think of the OOCO I don’t traditionally associate you with installation / exhibition design. How did you find working to such a scale? Is this the sort of work you’d like to be doing more of?

To be honest, I’ve had previous experiences working in all that scale on a lot of projects past and present. It’s different but certainly not daunting. I like it as you get to operate physically from the beginning and it adds an extra dimension to the way you have to think. I get a kick out of production, the physicality and the assembly of things, the fabrication, materials, scales and methods etc. are heightened in installation and exhibitions. Don’t get me wrong, they’re as important (if nor more) in the more 2-D medias like books and the likes, but more things can go west so you have to think a bit differently.

I always love designing spaces and things to go within spaces. It’s not a different way of thinking, just a different way of doing.

Working with a copywriter sounds like the traditional Art&Copy model, but you’re also quite the wordsmith (swear-smith?) and John (Goddard) is also a creative director – how collaborative was the process of writing and designing together?

It’s quite a flip-flop to be honest. John, besides being technically a copywriter, is a really visual person and often arms his ideas with a strong visual or aesthetic sensibility. He’s not there to simply write things or make sense of my sweary, garbled notes, but be a good art director too. And likewise I’m not just here for the pictures. I’ve never been a sketcher and always written ideas or talked them to a conclusion so generally we work extremely well together and alternate between the two. John’s words and I’m pictures, and I’m words and he’s pictures. And that relationships helps us get to a really good point. Plus we get on very well and laugh—a hell of a lot—which is important (and tends to be our yardstick for the quality of a project).

What’s next for OOCO? Anything in the pipeline you can share…

I’m working on the next book which I’ve curated and produced. It’s a different one to the Hand.Written.Letter.Project or The Democratic Lecture, but will be produced to the same standards and cover a theme I’ve always been interested in. This tome is a celebration of the intelligence, wit, humour and innate creativity of the working class. It’s a political book of graphic works from the seemingly ordinary person who can create the most extraordinarily powerful things. Alongside works from from an acclaimed film director, a Turner Prize winning artist, a YBA artist, will be stuff from my Dad and many many “amateur” creatives… bet you can’t wait for the press release on that one!



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Gerry Judah: Goodwood Sculptures

Calcutta-born, London-based artist and designer Gerry Judah has been delighting visitors to the Goodwood Festival of Speed with iconic and gravity-defying sculptures since 1997. Every year I look forward to seeing what he’s produced, and this around it’s a 26 metre high, 45 metre long, 160-tonne parabola steel arch celebrating 120 years of Mercedez Benz motorsport. The sculpture features two speedsters travelling in opposite directions. Engineering by Capita, production by Littlehampton Welding. Check out the making of video then look back at previous years centrepieces, all available to view on the site here.



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Behold The Man

It’s obvious when you’re looking at a piece of work whether it should be described as a labour of love. This is one such personal project, that was begun in 2009 by Marksteen Adamson, and is culminating in an exhibition currently on at ‘The Wilson’ in Cheltenham. ‘Behold The Man’ is the title given to the project, an honest and hopeful look at the situation of Alan Dainton, a rough sleeper in Cheltenham who is battling addiction.

Marksteen is a creative consultant and has won many awards at home and abroad. His agency ASHA is ranked in Design Week’s Top 100 as one of the most awarded agencies in the UK. Aside from his exceptional track record in agencies Marksteen also has some extensive projects and initiatives to his name (including The Cheltenham Design Festival). In 2004 he founded The Big Cold Turkey Foundation, supporting organisations actively concerned with youth at risk from drugs and alcohol.

I caught up with Marksteen to find out more about ‘Behold The Man’…

Sadly homelessness and substance addiction is a regular sight in our cities. Sum up why you felt Alan’s was a story that needed to be told? 

There is no silver bullet to this problem, but I wanted to explore the different avenues to see where my energy should be focused around this issue in the future. There is a time and place for ‘Sustination’, but its very short term. ‘Intervention’ relies very much on the individual being willing, so that’s not always an option, but ‘Prevention’ should be on the top of our list of priorities if we want to avoid an epidemic in the future. The problem with focussing on ‘Prevention’ is that, like climate change, it’s not tangible, because it hasn’t happened yet, and so therefore its hard to raise money, help people understand, or get support. People like to give to and support things they can see. It’s tragic really, because preventing a kid from going down this route will save the government tens of thousands of pounds a year per individual.

You started this project – or the relationship that lead to it – back in 2009. That’s a long time ago! Is ‘Behold The Man’ a one off or do you see yourself doing other self-initiated projects for ‘The Big Cold Turkey’ charity?

I’ve always had other personal projects going on like the School project in Tanzania, The Big Cold Turkey Foundation, Cheltenham Design Festival, setting up Kings community Café, or teaching young people to take better photos. I don’t think I could do my day job without these things ticking away in the background. It’s a nice change to have projects where I’m the only client.

Has Alan seen the exhibition, and if so, do you know what he thinks of it?

Yes, Alan has seen the exhibition and he loved it. He also got the fist copy of the signed and numbered limited edition book. He loved that too, and has always said the “even if it only helps one kid, telling my story will be worth it”

It’s obvious by the level of excellence and quality of finish that a lot of time and love (&money) has gone into ‘Behold The Man’ – how did you make it all happen?

I had an initial idea about what I wanted the book to be; layout, images and content and different papers and embossing. I wanted it to be slightly over the top, to clash with the subject matter. It was a deliberate attempt at making you feel slightly uncomfortable that so much effort and quality was devoted to what most people would consider to be a hopeless case of addiction, homelessness and total disregard for society. I wanted to make something beautiful out of the dirt and chaos of Alan’s world.

I wanted to flip ‘significance’. I wanted to confront our prejudices and make the ‘in-significant – significant’, and the perceived ‘significant – in-significant’ when experiencing the large portraits of Alan and the quality of the book. I wanted people to realise that we are all the same and we are all capable of being in that situation, had we had a different start in life. The difference is the choices we have made. Some of us just made better choices. Scott McGuffy, Simon Dryland and Chris Greenwood also worked tirelessly with me on design, paper selection and general quality standards. Andy at Severn Print was also instrumental in making the print happen the way it did. We got a lot of support from him. It was not and easy print job! Also, Hannah, our super project manager worked really hard managing all the suppliers, timelines and quotes. The ASHA team have been an amazing support.

If you’d like to support the work of the Cheltenham YMCA which helps homeless young people you can purchase the book, postcards and posters on The Big Cold Turkey site, here.

You can watch the 30 minute film that accompanies the book here – It contains scenes of drug-taking that some viewers might find upsetting.





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Build & Coast Modern: Competition

In 2012, filmmakers Gavin Froome and Michael Bernard approached Build to design a limited edition poster to promote their documentary film ‘Coast Modern’. To celebrate the UK DVD launch of the film in London this summer, Gavin and Michael have invited Build to exhibit a selection of prints inspired by the film. It promises to be an interesting mix of West Coast Modernist Architecture and British Graphic Design! There will be opportunity to meet the team behind the documentary and members of design studio Build, and to watch a full screening of the documentary.

Build have designed a brand new Coast Modern screen print, limited to an edition of 100 only, that will be available to purchase, and an extremely limited set of 5 typographic prints, each with a word or statement taken directly from the film.

To celebrate the exhibition we’re offering one lucky FFF’er the chance to win 1 x Coast Modern 2014 A1 screen print and a DVD. Entry is simple, just answer this question… Where is design studio Build based?

Wandsworth, Wembley, Walthamstow or Waterloo.

Send your answer to sophie@wearebuild.com. The competition closes on Friday 6th June, prints will be available to purchase from Monday 9th.

Exclusive UK launch of the highly acclaimed documentary Coast Modern — presented by filmmakers Gavin Froome & Mike Bernard, in association with Twofold Films, Build and Mead Carney.

Saturday 14th (10am – 8pm) – Sunday 15th June (12pm – 6pm) Location: Mead Carney, 45 Dover Street, London, W1S 4FF Documentary screening on Saturday 14th June at 4pm.



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Sean Clarke Update

Time flies! We featured Sean Clarke back in 2009 when he was a promising 3rd year at Falmouth. In the years since he’s had stints at some great places including Browns, Pentagram, SAS and Studio 8 Design. He’s been in touch to let us know about a new Puma project for the World Cup, undertaken recently while freelancing at Neighbour.

“To announce the release of the Tricks collection we designed a limited edition presentation box that was sent out to writers, bloggers and PUMA footballers. The box is made from 4 odd-coloured compartments which house each of the boots in the collection. Concealed magnets hold the sections together creating an adaptable and playful way of holding the boots.”

Credits: Creative Direction, Sean Clarke. Designed at Neighbour. Produced by Nirvana. Images by Sam Ford.

 




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Hue – Outset

The Creative Arts Network have launched their first print publication ‘Hue’. The magazine discusses aspects of creative studio culture and practice, stretching across a wide and varied range of creative disciplines from the unique approach of creatives connected to the Church. Outset, the pilot edition of Hue, explores the origin of ideas behind self-initiated works and what drives ideas when clients aren’t paying. Cover artwork is by Tommy Chandra.

Editor Chris Smyth “We invited a number of studios, freelancers and creative directors from around the world to comment on the process behind their self-initiated works and studio projects. Encouraging them to respond however they felt appropriate, resulting in a unique style of publication exploring a regular feature for creatives across a range of disciplines.”

289x400mm, Newspaper, 28 pages. Pick up your copy here.



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Telegramme + Percival

The ever brilliant Telegramme have teamed up with Percival Menswear to launch a unique poster campaign, mixing classic illustration with brand new technology. I’ll let the guys explain…

‘The 3 posters are inspired by 50′s airline and travel ads, the limited colour palette and contrasted lighting suit the Percival aesthetic, the craft and time that has gone into the illustrations break up the monotony of the brash club fly poster, whilst being engaging, social and interactive.’ – Bobby Evans, Telegramme

‘Rather than a simple shoot/look book we wanted to create a campaign that had an engaging social element. Instead of concentrating on images and styling of specific garments we were trying to create a context for the brand and get across our personality and how we work.’ – Chris Gove – Percival Director / Designer  

Percival will be posting hundreds of these around London across three weekends 26th – 27th April, 3rd – 4th May & 10th – 11th May, each poster will have an interactive set of codes allowing the user to win there very own piece of Percival. So if you see a poster just simply scan the code on the poster to win. If that doesn’t make enough sense – check out this video.



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She Was Only – Update

Lovely new site for loveable rogues She Was Only who we last featured in 2012 (featuring plenty of great work). I’m reliably informed the very talented Liz & Max Haarala Hamilton were involved with the studio photography and Jon Ryder on the copy front.   

Of particular note is the newly re-designed Boat Magazine and corresponding website – great to see the mag going from strength to strength – and fitting it has had a facelift with its new focus on fashion. 



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BCNMCR Reviewed

Last week saw BCNMCR (sponsored by Shillington College and organised by designer Dave Sedgwick) take place across Manchester, including a day of talks from Barcelona studios SOLOTOORMIXLAURA MESEGUERATIPUSCLASE BCN, and TWO POINTS.  A total of eleven studios (including FFF favourites Alex Trochut and Brosmind) are involved in this years free exhibition at Northern Quarter venue Twenty Twenty Two (formerly 2022NQ), which opened on March 27 and runs until April 23rd, with most designing exclusive new work especially for the show. A few of us from FFF descended upon the city to see what we could learn from our European friends in the beautiful setting of the Halle.

Needless to say, the talks were brilliant – full of humour, insight and passion.

Read more



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SEA Design

At FFF we try not to post about the same studio too often – but I was very surprised to see we’ve not featured SEA Design since 2008! Since they’ve just had a new site we thought it was high time we (and you) took another look at their impressive body of work. There’s far more to see than we can show here though, so scoot on over and have a proper look around their new digital home.



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Someone is selling your work as their own on fiverr

solarbang on Clim

Beautiful work!

Julius on From Austria to NYC

Think the title might’ve been misinterpreted. For “shit” read “stuff” or “things” maybe?

Phil Howard on Shit showreels say

This is really good, very funny, especially the ‘to fast to appreciate it…’ bit! I would slightly agree with Jim though. These are all just a collection of treatments/styles and they do work within various contexts. It’s probably a bit …

Chris on Shit showreels say

So watch constitutes ‘not Shit’ exactly? You can’t craft a statement as confident and entertaining as this without so much as a hint of a retort, surely? The fact is that some of these tricks actually do work in certain …

Jim on Shit showreels say

Stunning design and simply lines. Great stuff.

Jai @ DeFrae on Gomez by Savvy Studio

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