FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1506 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1178 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 69 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 318 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 124 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 70 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 24 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 15 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 4 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

Looking for something?

FFFxOFFF
Teaser trailer

Categories rowsEverything Interviews Books Events Jobs

Features

next

Studio Series #1 – Well Made Studio

Welcome to the first in a new series of features in which we delve deeper into the business side of running a design studio.

Over the course of the series we’ll be hearing from a range of our favourite studios, some with years of history to others with six months. Why were they formed in the first place and how have they saved the ship from almost sinking. How do they gain their clients, and what happens when they lose them?

Read more



next

Interview: Kate Moross

Kicking off our series of interviews from this years OFFF in Barcelona is none other than London’s Kate Moross. The ‘jack of all trades’ with the ever-changing hair color and one hell of a list of clients was incredibly fun to talk to. We covered everything from work, happiness, her dislike for ‘inspiration’, writing her first book, pizza and her plans for her first action movie. After our interview we all had an even greater admiration for her work ethic and output. Make sure you set aside 15min to check out the video.

FYI: You still have a little time to reserve your early-bird ticket to next years OFFFest in Barcelona. We’ll see you there!



next

Rapper’s Delight: The Hip Hop Cookbook

Introducing your new favourite cookbook; Rapper’s Delight: The Hip Hop Cookbook

Jointly created by Joseph Inniss, Peter Stadden and Ralph Miller, The Hip Hop Cookbook features 30 recipes inspired by your all time favourite Hip Hop artists of today and yesteryear.

Each of the recipes is then accompanied by a bespoke piece of artwork, created by a selection of the UK’s best upcoming illustrators.

Read more



next

We Need Nothing to Collide

Russ Chimes, the London based producer, remixer and DJ is back where he belongs with his new EP Sula. Continuing a trend, Chimes has teamed up with superior video wizard Mark Wheeler to create the immense new video for Chimes’ latest release entitled ‘We Need Nothing to Collide’.

The video is the culmination of a series of visual sounds experiments that overlap each other to create realtime visuals taken directly from Chimes’ latest tune. The experiments can all be used for live performance, as well as choreographed animation. Experiments 1 & 2 shown after the jump were created using live MIDI notes, BPM and CC values to create visuals with a tightness to the music that wouldn’t be possible with only audio data.

Read more



next

Welcome to the world of Omnisense

This week I came across a website that offered one of the most immersive interactive experiences I have witnessed online this far. The Omnisense website markets an imaginary product called O+ and will guide you through the calibration process and initial test of the product. It makes use of your smartphone as a second screen and controller to guide you through a slightly gruesome scenario in the not to distant future.

I thought it might be a hoax site for a big budget movie but it turned out to be a final year student project. Intrigued I spoke to Florian Morel about Omnisense to find out more…

Hi Florian, would you mind telling us a little more about the Omnisense project?

Sure, Omnisense emerged from a general theme; The perception of our world and the enhancement of our senses.

We use our senses to gather informations from our world, but little by little we contribute to the birth of a new world. A digital world, containing information about everything: locations (like google maps), what you like (pinterest), who your friends are (facebook), where you work (linkedin), what you know (wikipedia), what you don’t know (wikileaks). It is becoming more and more a duplicate of our world. This digital environment grows more and more each day but we’re not equipped to interact with it.

However we use some devices such as smartphones which become kind of a body extension, allowing us to access this digital world.

What if you could access these data without the need for such a device ? What if we could get a new sense suited for this digital world? With this background in mind, how would all this personal data affect our life and our judgement?

In the end, it’s all about current problems (personal data on the web) and how to talk about a serious topic in a engaging and immersive way.

Some references that inspired us were: Google Glass, Trask and Weyland Industries, Black Mirror, The Wolf Among Us, transhumanism & body hacking (“L’Humanité augmentée” – Augmented humanity, by Eric Sadin, and “L’être et l’écran” – The being and the screen, by Stéphane Vial).

Read more



next

Interview: Frank Chimero on Another Studio

Until June this year, designer Frank Chimero worked under his own name. A lot of us designers do this and just as many will find a suitable moniker to work under. It is a question that I struggled with over the past year. In the end decided to ditch my company name in favour of my own.

When I read that Frank was starting a studio called Another I thought it would be a great opportunity to get his thoughts on the topic.

Hi Frank, first of all can you tell us a little more about Another Studio?

Another is my one-man design studio focused on taking the knowledge and conventions of digital and bringing them back to print (and vice versa). Projects come in one of two forms: I handle everything and work closely with the client like a traditional studio, or I plug into the client’s internal design and dev team to help shepherd along a project. It’s a lifestyle business—meaning it’s primary reason for existence is to act as a little Frank-powered machine to contribute good things to culture and help me have the life I want to live.

So you’ll continue with your personal work under your own name?

Yes! Working under a studio name leaves my personal name free for my books, writing, and other artistic pursuits.

Do you feel that a company name will open other doors than working as Frank Chimero?

Of course, otherwise there’d be no reason to do it. I suppose the day-to-day looks a lot like my work days from the past few years, but I decided to formalize the endeavor to leave some room for collaborations and to not have to stick to the aesthetic people have come to expect from me. Read more



next

Webydo Launches Its Code-Free Parallax Scrolling Animator

Parallax scrolling has been making headlines in our industry for a couple of years now. Even big influencers have made advances in parallax scrolling animator, one of the most impressive and original of these being Webydo, which has recently added the Parallax Scrolling Animator to its code-free design suite. Readers of FFF can be among the first to create a parallax scrolling site with Webydo’s code-free design studio. Simply head over to Webydo and sign up for an account so that you too can create a code-free parallax site.

Once you sign up for Webydo’s invitation, make sure that you read through the tips below for parallax scrolling so that you can properly implement the maximum effect for the most impact.

What is Parallax Scrolling?

Parallax scrolling has been around since the 1980s in 2D video games when the forefront graphics moved at a different speed than the background. In web design, parallax scrolling works a lot like video games in that different elements on the page move at different speeds. This creates a 3D effect and adds depth and interest to a website.

The problem now is that parallax scrolling has been both overdone and done badly, which means that some designers are shying away from the effect. And often, parallax sites include issues in site speed, mobile use, SEO, and usability. With these considerations in mind, has the parallax scrolling trend run its course?

Actually, many would argue that parallax is here to stay, rather than just a passing fad. As with most trends, there are solutions to the problems it initially has shown, as Zack Rutherford points out in his UX Magazine article. Parallax can provide a useful tool in creating ”wow factor” and allowing designers to stretch their legs creatively. Webydo made parallax available to its users exactly for these reasons.

How can Parallax boost professional website design?

Let’s face it – parallax scrolling just looks cool. It keeps users engaged, provides an interactive feel to a design, and overall keeps visitors on a page longer, which in turn can increase conversions.

Unleashed Technologies describes parallax scrolling as a technique that takes “the user experience to a new interactive level of online viewing.” Used in a story-like layout, parallax is a solution for web designers in creating websites that are more appealing to visitors.

Examples of Parallax.

The Sony store website shows just how creative you can get with parallax scrolling. When you create a parallax scrolling site with Webydo’s professional design studio, keep in mind the techniques used on the Sony Be Moved page. It begins with an introduction to the story of their company, and as viewers scroll down through the site, the story unfolds via parallax.

While scrolling, the parts of a Sony product “float” together to show how the technology came to be. The interesting part is that one funky part is thrown in, such as the lollipop mixed in with the parts that make up Sony’s mobile phone camera lens attachment. Users can click the + button to read interesting tidbits. It’s little extras like these that really make a site unique.

Site speed and mobile problems.

Two negatives of parallax involve mobile compatibility and site speed. Fortunately, Webydo’s parallax animator is optimized for quick load speed and mobile compatibility, so users don’t have to worry about these aspects.

And Sony shows another way that designers can further speed up a website: it does not try to keep all of the content on a single page. Its menu at the top of the page leads to product pages, an easy aspect Webydo users can also implement.

SEO and usability problems.

Two more complaints of parallax scrolling designs are poor SEO and usability. SEO problems are usually due to designers simply leaving this consideration out of a design, which is why Webydo makes it easy to include important SEO factors like meta-tags.

To avoid usability issues, simply use Webydo’s advanced design suite to add in factors such as chapter buttons. Sony kept the buttons inconspicuous – descriptions only pop open when users hover the mouse over each chapter button.

Is it just a fad or here to stay?

The difference between a fad and trend is that a fad passes quickly but a trend remains for more than just a season. Parallax Scrolling has been in web design for a while now, which is a good indicator that it’s here to stay.

It is true that parallax is an intimidating design style to learn, especially with no code experience. But this is why so many designers are taking up the chance to create their clients websites with Webydo’s code-free parallax scrolling animator. One designer even created a Game of Thrones teaser site for “Death Is Coming”. Now the possibilities are limitless, so you can create your site today with Webydo and join the growing community of 95K professional designers around the world who designing with Webydo.

This article is presented by Webydo’s community of professional designers.



next

Registration Summer School is now open!

Roll up! Roll up! South London’s Registration Summer School is now open!

Three days of design lead workshops, lectures, performances and social activities from a selection of design professionals including Sebastian Zimmerhackl and Anthony Burrill alongside the brilliant Hato Press Studio.

Set in a disused primary school, in the Borough of Lewisham Registration is out to deliver experiential education methods that seek to give insight and inspire students. I chatted to Ross Bennett, one of the brains behind the programme to find a little bit more about what’s going on;

How did you come around to putting together Registration?

A friend and recent graduate (Callum Copley) approached myself (Ross Bennett) and Andrew Thorpe, designers who live in South London – with an idea for a summer school. Callum had been to a few different programmes over seas, like ‘After School Club’ in Offenbach, Germany.

Eike König From the studio ‘Hort’ and students from the Offenbach University ran the event in together as a joint project. Callum had a great time and found the collaboration between students and practitioners on such a non-hierarchical level really inspiring. Being surrounded by so many talented students in such short period of time (3 days) and being asked to produce work is an amazing experience.

There wasn’t really anything offering the same kind of fun, free educational structure that we thought there should be over here. So we’re making it happen.

Who should be looking to apply?

You should be interested in approaching subjects from all angles, researching and be open to creative briefs. We don’t want to limit it to Art and design students. But it will probably be past, present or future students that look to get involved in a fun project to challenge their notions of practice.

We want to cultivate a group of multi-practice individuals. We’ll try to make the selected group of students as diverse as possible so that they get the most from each other as well as from the guests that will be delivering workshops, and lectures.

Why the subject of Fear?

After a lot of discussion around whether or not there should be a theme and what it should be we thought it would help the practitioners we were inviting to work from a topic.

As Callum was a recent graduate and as myself and Andrew know only too well University is riddled with fear, just about every human being out there has their share of fears. Be they daily and trivial, or a severe disorder. We feel that fear as a topic isn’t that widely discussed within art and design, especially within education and practice.

We want to open up the theme discuss it without being afraid and maybe think about ways that we can suffer less from it and create work out of it. Across the 3 days and with such a breadth of guests we hope that the theme will be approached from many different perspectives.

What’s in the pipeline for future Registrations?

It’s very easy to start thinking too far into future before things have happened but it would be nice to keep ourselves open to the possibilities of a developed and new programme hopefully with the new network of people we form from this first registration.

It would be great to take on residencies in unused schools during their summer breaks. And definitely to keep working on projects that open up alternative education methods and maintain an element of fun and remain social at their core.

- – -

Registration Summer School - Open from the 19th to the 21st of August

Find more on Registration at: www.registrationschool.co.uk



next

Hi-Response Competition – Closed

[EDIT] This competition is now closed.

So, you still haven’t got around to that long overdue portfolio refresh? Good. You’ll be glad you waited as we’ve got 3 free licenses for the pretty freaking amazing Hi-Response, a truly modular WordPress theme.

Created by Emil Olsson, Hi-Response is optimised for portfolio and blog sites in the need of a flexible template. The theme allows control over pretty much everything from layout, colors, typography and interaction making it easy to stand out (without the need to code!).

Some of the FFF team already use Hi-Response and love it, so we think you will too.

If you fancy your chances of winning a Hi-Response license simply Follow @FormFiftyFive & and tweet using this link.

The competition closes on Monday June 2014 at 23:59 GMT. We’ll choose the winners at random from Twitter providing the tweet contains the hashtag #HiResponseFFFComp and that you’re following @FormFiftyFive. We’ll announce the winners shortly after closing date. Winners will be contacted via Twitter and mentioned in this post.

Best of luck.



next

PageLayers competiton—closed

We’ve got 7 free copies of the awesome layered PSD website screen gabbing app PageLayers to give away to you, our readers.

If you’ve never come across PageLayers, give it an URL and it’ll parses through the HTML code and output a layered version of the site in a full editable PSD format. If you’re on a newer version of Photoshop (CS5+) it’ll even give you text as editable layers and vector objects. Very helpful indeed.

We’ve been using PageLayers for a while and we absolutely love it, having saved us countless hours of tediously rebuilding websites for visuals and redesigns.

If you fancy your chances and winning a copy of of PageLayers then here’s how to enter.

Follow @formfiftyfive (if you don’t already) and tweet us the following phrase (make sure the hashtag #PageLayersFFFComp is included).

We’re giving away 7 copies of @PageLayers because we love it so much. Follow @FormFiftyFive & RT for your chance to win. #PageLayersFFFComp (Clicking the link to tweet).

Best of luck.

This competition is now closed.

And the winners are… @Lilesey @JakeHob @Lee_Fairhurst @jpryordesign @mattwicke @marcus_mccabe @njacksondesign.

Thank you to everyone who entered. It’s great to see so many other people love PageLayers as much as we do. Commiseration to those who didn’t win this time.

Read more



next

Getting to know; Bread Collective

East London design collective Bread have been working together since 2011. Creating a wide variety of projects that range from adorning artwork across London’s most iconic architecture to collaborating on their own Lacoste boot.

Oh and for our Hackney based readers, some of you might recognise their very special ‘The Walls Have Ears” mural that spread for 100 metre’s around Hackney Wick, the leading walk to the Olympic Park in East London.

I caught up with Luke from Bread to find out a little bit more about the past and the future…

Read more



next

Getting to know; Elana Schlenker

It’s no easy job finding someone who publishes great work under the description of ‘typographic smut’. But lucky for us, we managed to find someone who does – introducing, graphic design extraordinaire; Elana Schlenker.

Aside from the smut, entitled ‘Gratuitous Type‘ Schlenker owns an outstanding book of work ranging from print to identity with pieces for digital also. As if that wasn’t enough already, way back when in 2013 Elana was added to Print magazine’s New Visual Artist list, a prestigious annual distinction that recognizes the industry’s top 20 creative talents under the age of 30.

We sat down, over the internet mind to find out a little more on where it all began, and what’s coming up next.

Read more



next

Studio of the week: Adaptable

The last couple of studios we’ve featured on SOTW have been predominantly less digitally focussed so it’s a real pleasure to this week stumble across the new portfolio of Birmingham based Adaptable.

Specialising in digital experiences, Adaptable’s book is full of some really tight online work – and it’s not just in the jpgs. Having a look at the work in detail the studios knocked out some solid dev work on top of some brilliant design.

For more work, hit read more, or check out their out their portfolio here.

http://weareadaptable.com/ https://twitter.com/weareadaptable



next

Studio of the week: Two Points

Introducing Two Points, our fifth studio of the week from the capital of Catalonia, Barcelona! Founded in 2007 by Lupi Asensio and Martin Lorenz, the studio has gone on to create a number of visually exciting graphic pieces across branding, print and digital.

It also happens that Two Points are doing a talk in London, next wednesday at the palace of Shoreditch that is, Poke London. To get your hands on a free ticket head over to their Eventbrite page here.



next

Getting to know Playground Paris

Delving in to who produced the great new portfolio site for Studio Twice unravelled Playground Paris. The studio name for graphic designer Valentin Adam, which was founded back in 2011. With a wide range of great graphic and illustration work covering both print and digital, we were totally sold. Gratefully, I managed to grab a second out of Adam’s exciting schedule to get to know Playground a little better.

How did Playground begin?

Playground begun with a desire to have fun while working. I’ve been a freelancer for 8 years now, mostly working within web & motion design, and my love for typography & colour became stronger and stronger, but I didn’t have the time to play with it. I stopped everything for 2 months, to experiment & have fun with colour and letters, and I decided to create my own playing field, my own playground.

What are you up to at the moment?

What’s good with Playground is that I can work in various fields. I’m now working on some motion graphics for Le Coq Sportif, an identity design for a theatre company, art direction for a record label, an event identity for a design exhibition by Orange, some websites and maybe a book design, soon… I never have the same day, the same demands, the same clients, as I don’t have a special “style” I can have fun searching the good tone for each demand.

What would be your favourite piece from your current portfolio, what are you most proud of?

It’s quite hard, as I love to change as much as possible my work. I would say I like some works in different fields, for example Iconoclast Image’s website, the photos I did for Sosh’s tumblr or maybe the still at-work identity for PlusPlus, but I think Playground is still missing one huge project, which I can decline over identity, print design, posters, web… Read more



Supported by

Recent features

View all features

Topics

Recent Jobs

+ Add a job to this list

Mid-Senior Designer

Guerrilla , Gold Coast, Australia
out

Mid-Senior Digital Designer

mavis, London
out

Mid-weight Designer / Art Director

Crush Creative, Brighton, UK
out

Middleweight Designer

SEA, London, United Kingdom
out

Junior Designer

MC2, United Kingdom
out

Designer

Whitespace, Edinburgh
out

Senior Designer

Creative Marketing Services, Leeds
out

Chatter

Emma

This is the best thing I’ve ever seen.

Emma on F-Bombs for Feminism

So good thanks.

otomatikkapi on Miika Saksi

Wow, this work is incredible.

Luchia Bloomfield on Telegramme Paper Co.

Pete! Nice one :) lovely work let’s catch up soon! Jo

Jo on Peter Clarkson

Huge fan of Stanley’s work for a long long time… inspirational.

Petemandotnet on Stanley Chow

Beautifully designed book. I read it too and while I’m also not the target audience, I enjoyed it nonetheless. She has a tone of voice in her writing that is hard not to like.

Luchia Bloomfield on Review: Kate Moross / Make Your Own Luck

Playlist