FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1518 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1178 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 76 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 320 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 125 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 70 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 25 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 16 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 4 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

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Features

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Review: Shaughnessy x Brook

In this second of our year end reviews we’re looking again at publishing, this time focussing on books. Who better to speak to on the subject than the duo responsible for FFF-favourite Unit Editions – Adrian Shaughnessy and Tony Brook. With Manuals 2 [Unit 18] still flying off the virtual shelves we hear their individual reflections, highlights & predictions…

Tell us what it is you do, and why you do it..

AS/ I’m a graphic designer, writer and senior tutor in Visual Communication at RCA, and as one of the co-founders of Unit Editions, I’m also a publisher –but even after five years of Unit, it still sounds odd to write that. Me a publisher? Well, yes, actually. As for why I do what I do? Paranoia, fear and self-doubt.

TB/ I’m a designer at Spin and a (relatively recent) publisher with Unit Editions, I also collect graphic design and have curated a couple of exhibitions. I didn’t have any real choice about the design aspect, it is a vocation; I’m lucky enough to love what I do. The other three facets have happily fallen out of the first.

Can you both give us a couple of personal highlights from the year?

AS/ I’m not very good at looking back. I can barely remember what I did last week, far less think about what was happening in January. In my view, you only look back when you don’t have much to look forward to. There’s never been a time in my life when I haven’t had an immediate future stacked with deadlines, objectives and targets. When I’m in the old folks home with my hearing aid and pacemaker, I might start to look back. Having said that, I’d say that the success of our two Manuals books has been a highlight. Two weeks in Japan was also pretty good. Curating a show of 50 years of graphic design at the RCA was fun. But other than that it has been relentless work, work, and more work.

TB/ It’s been quite a year. I got to visit New Zealand through an invitation to talk at Semi-Permanent. It was a fabulous experience: I got to hang out with the legend that is Dean Poole from Alt group. Work-wise, seeing Manuals 2 in print has been incredibly satisfying, and launching the Spin website was a real highlight. Meeting up with Lance Wyman and Paula Scher was the cherry on top.

You collaborate on Unit Editions, how did that all come about?

AS/ I’d reached a point where I was fed up working with mainstream publishers and was beginning to think about starting my own imprint. I went to the pub with Tony and he said he was also contemplating starting a publishing venture. He had already done some self-publishing so he was ahead of me. But it made lots of sense that we combine our skills and use the knowledge and experience we’d both accumulated as studio owners over many years to start Unit.

TB/ As Adrian mentioned we had a fortuitous meeting where, after the shortest time, we realised that our ambitions were very similar and that our mutual interest and skill sets meant that we could make something work. There was a giant Unit Editions-shaped whole for books that balanced out (hopefully) beautiful design with rich visual and written content.

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Review: magCulture x Stack

It’s been another bumper year for editorial design and independent publishing – plenty of new titles hit the shelves (and blogs) in 2014 – and many events and initiatives launched or returned – all pointing towards an industry in rude health. We caught up with Steve Watson and Jeremy Leslie, two of the industry figures most passionate about print, to get their reflections, highlights & predictions…

Tell us what it is you do, and why you do it..

SW/ I send out a different independent magazine every month to a couple of thousand subscribers around the world. And I do it because I’m in love with the ideas and energy in the best independent magazines, and I know that there are a lot more people out there who would love these magazines if they could only discover them.

JL/ I design, write and publish. Most of my time is spent designing, working with clients on their magazines, apps and websites at the magCulture studio. Alongside this I promote creative editorial design via the magCulture website, conferences and other events. And we publish a few things – we just launched our first magazine Fiera in collaboration with Katie Tregidden. I do it because I find editorial design fascinating. Design in an editorial context is not surface, it is content.

Can you each give us a couple of personal highlights from the year?

SW/ Jeremy’s Modern Magazine Conference was really great – it’s fantastic that he’s able to bring magazine makers from all over the world to London for one big get together. And at the opposite end of the conference spectrum, I also had a fantastic time at Indiecon in Hamburg. It was the first time they’d held the event and it was a genuinely indie production – a group of young friends doing something because they really care about it.

JL/ Things to remember include working with Douglas Coupland on Kitten Clone; taking Printout to Bristol; eating at Noma; putting together a radio show for Pick Me Up radio; discovering Limewood with Lesley; collaborating with Vitsoe on the 620 Reading Room; helping design a live stage show to mark Maison Moderne’s 20th anniversary. And moving from home into the new studio space.

You guys collaborate on Printout – how did that come about?

SW/ Way back when I first started working for The Church of London I went from having one day a week for Stack, to having two days a week. I was really keen to experiment with magazine events, and I remember speaking to Jeremy at The Church of London offices and realising that we’d both been having similar ideas. We realised that this wasn’t going to be either a Stack or a magCulture thing, so we knocked some ideas for names back and forth and a few weeks later we were running our first ever Printout.

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15 reasons to visit the OFFF 2015

In preparation for next year’s 15th Anniversary of the OFFFest in Barcelona we are giving you no less than 15 great reasons to book your tickets and a flight to sunny Spain.

1. Watch Signalnoise (James White) opening the Main Titles for the first time in his career for OFFF Barcelona 2015.

2. Get your hands on the OFFF 15th Anniversary limited edition book by Vasava.

3. Take a walk around Barcelona’s gothic quarter.

4. Be the first to hear about exclusive projects announcements by featured speakers like Territory studio, GMUNK and more!

5. Experience Joshua Davis exclusive chillout project and float in The Deepest of Space.

6. Help Michael Cina rebrand OFFF.

7. Watch the sunset from Guell Park.

8. Make Your Own Robot with Jan De Coster.

9. Discover with Renascent the Evolution of Copying in an awesome workshop.

10. Enjoy a drink and one hell of a view from the Silken Diagonal Hotel rooftop.

11. Create circles out of abstract shapes with Rik Oostenbroek.

12. Eat some tapas in Barcelona. We can recommend L’Ostia.

13. Watch featured artist SNASK “special performance that will blow everyone’s mind OFFF”.

14. Explore the OFFF Market Street where loads of great designers and makers sell their wares.

15. Hire a bike and ride off your OFFF closing-party hangover.

There you go. If that doesn’t convince you, nothing will! Get your tickets now.



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Studio Series #2 – The Bakery

Roll up, roll up, it’s time for the second of our new Studio Series insights! This week we’re travelling to the capital of Russia, Moscow! for an insight into one of the countries most exciting up and coming studios, The Bakery!

We got on our imaginary EasyJet flight (also known as GMail) to chat to Ivan from the studio about why they do what they do, and what’s going on in Russia these days…

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How did the Bakery come together?

I was about to find a job in Moscow, but was feeling uninspired by the interviews I was going through. I didn’t feel any relation to their creative output and thought they were lagging behind.

Anna (my partner & wife) suggested we’d try to go on our own and establish a practice with different attitude towards work and studio culture. We wanted to do contemporary stuff, try new things, work with materials and print — things that are still not that popular in Russia.

Did you both have a bit of business knowledge before setting thing up?

We thought we did :) From what we’ve experienced at previous jobs we had some basic knowledge of how a studio operates, but when we started we had to sort lots of legal stuff, find a space, set up accounts and all of this was completely new to us. We also had to manage clients ourselves, take care of billing and payments, etc. There are lots of things I’d have done differently if I had the knowledge I have now.

How do you two split the business side against the creative side?

Luckily there are two of us, so Anna manages the business side, while I manage things related to design and we also contribute to each other’s duties. But still there are routine tasks I have to carry out on my own and they take a lot of time, so I try to work from home, either at breakfast or before I go to bed.

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Studio Series #1 – Well Made Studio

Welcome to the first in a new series of features in which we delve deeper into the business side of running a design studio.

Over the course of the series we’ll be hearing from a range of our favourite studios, some with years of history to others with six months. Why were they formed in the first place and how have they saved the ship from almost sinking. How do they gain their clients, and what happens when they lose them?

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Interview: Kate Moross

Kicking off our series of interviews from this years OFFF in Barcelona is none other than London’s Kate Moross. The ‘jack of all trades’ with the ever-changing hair color and one hell of a list of clients was incredibly fun to talk to. We covered everything from work, happiness, her dislike for ‘inspiration’, writing her first book, pizza and her plans for her first action movie. After our interview we all had an even greater admiration for her work ethic and output. Make sure you set aside 15min to check out the video.

FYI: You still have a little time to reserve your early-bird ticket to next years OFFFest in Barcelona. We’ll see you there!



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Rapper’s Delight: The Hip Hop Cookbook

Introducing your new favourite cookbook; Rapper’s Delight: The Hip Hop Cookbook

Jointly created by Joseph Inniss, Peter Stadden and Ralph Miller, The Hip Hop Cookbook features 30 recipes inspired by your all time favourite Hip Hop artists of today and yesteryear.

Each of the recipes is then accompanied by a bespoke piece of artwork, created by a selection of the UK’s best upcoming illustrators.

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We Need Nothing to Collide

Russ Chimes, the London based producer, remixer and DJ is back where he belongs with his new EP Sula. Continuing a trend, Chimes has teamed up with superior video wizard Mark Wheeler to create the immense new video for Chimes’ latest release entitled ‘We Need Nothing to Collide’.

The video is the culmination of a series of visual sounds experiments that overlap each other to create realtime visuals taken directly from Chimes’ latest tune. The experiments can all be used for live performance, as well as choreographed animation. Experiments 1 & 2 shown after the jump were created using live MIDI notes, BPM and CC values to create visuals with a tightness to the music that wouldn’t be possible with only audio data.

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Welcome to the world of Omnisense

This week I came across a website that offered one of the most immersive interactive experiences I have witnessed online this far. The Omnisense website markets an imaginary product called O+ and will guide you through the calibration process and initial test of the product. It makes use of your smartphone as a second screen and controller to guide you through a slightly gruesome scenario in the not to distant future.

I thought it might be a hoax site for a big budget movie but it turned out to be a final year student project. Intrigued I spoke to Florian Morel about Omnisense to find out more…

Hi Florian, would you mind telling us a little more about the Omnisense project?

Sure, Omnisense emerged from a general theme; The perception of our world and the enhancement of our senses.

We use our senses to gather informations from our world, but little by little we contribute to the birth of a new world. A digital world, containing information about everything: locations (like google maps), what you like (pinterest), who your friends are (facebook), where you work (linkedin), what you know (wikipedia), what you don’t know (wikileaks). It is becoming more and more a duplicate of our world. This digital environment grows more and more each day but we’re not equipped to interact with it.

However we use some devices such as smartphones which become kind of a body extension, allowing us to access this digital world.

What if you could access these data without the need for such a device ? What if we could get a new sense suited for this digital world? With this background in mind, how would all this personal data affect our life and our judgement?

In the end, it’s all about current problems (personal data on the web) and how to talk about a serious topic in a engaging and immersive way.

Some references that inspired us were: Google Glass, Trask and Weyland Industries, Black Mirror, The Wolf Among Us, transhumanism & body hacking (“L’Humanité augmentée” – Augmented humanity, by Eric Sadin, and “L’être et l’écran” – The being and the screen, by Stéphane Vial).

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Interview: Frank Chimero on Another Studio

Until June this year, designer Frank Chimero worked under his own name. A lot of us designers do this and just as many will find a suitable moniker to work under. It is a question that I struggled with over the past year. In the end decided to ditch my company name in favour of my own.

When I read that Frank was starting a studio called Another I thought it would be a great opportunity to get his thoughts on the topic.

Hi Frank, first of all can you tell us a little more about Another Studio?

Another is my one-man design studio focused on taking the knowledge and conventions of digital and bringing them back to print (and vice versa). Projects come in one of two forms: I handle everything and work closely with the client like a traditional studio, or I plug into the client’s internal design and dev team to help shepherd along a project. It’s a lifestyle business—meaning it’s primary reason for existence is to act as a little Frank-powered machine to contribute good things to culture and help me have the life I want to live.

So you’ll continue with your personal work under your own name?

Yes! Working under a studio name leaves my personal name free for my books, writing, and other artistic pursuits.

Do you feel that a company name will open other doors than working as Frank Chimero?

Of course, otherwise there’d be no reason to do it. I suppose the day-to-day looks a lot like my work days from the past few years, but I decided to formalize the endeavor to leave some room for collaborations and to not have to stick to the aesthetic people have come to expect from me. Read more



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Webydo Launches Its Code-Free Parallax Scrolling Animator

Parallax scrolling has been making headlines in our industry for a couple of years now. Even big influencers have made advances in parallax scrolling animator, one of the most impressive and original of these being Webydo, which has recently added the Parallax Scrolling Animator to its code-free design suite. Readers of FFF can be among the first to create a parallax scrolling site with Webydo’s code-free design studio. Simply head over to Webydo and sign up for an account so that you too can create a code-free parallax site.

Once you sign up for Webydo’s invitation, make sure that you read through the tips below for parallax scrolling so that you can properly implement the maximum effect for the most impact.

What is Parallax Scrolling?

Parallax scrolling has been around since the 1980s in 2D video games when the forefront graphics moved at a different speed than the background. In web design, parallax scrolling works a lot like video games in that different elements on the page move at different speeds. This creates a 3D effect and adds depth and interest to a website.

The problem now is that parallax scrolling has been both overdone and done badly, which means that some designers are shying away from the effect. And often, parallax sites include issues in site speed, mobile use, SEO, and usability. With these considerations in mind, has the parallax scrolling trend run its course?

Actually, many would argue that parallax is here to stay, rather than just a passing fad. As with most trends, there are solutions to the problems it initially has shown, as Zack Rutherford points out in his UX Magazine article. Parallax can provide a useful tool in creating ”wow factor” and allowing designers to stretch their legs creatively. Webydo made parallax available to its users exactly for these reasons.

How can Parallax boost professional website design?

Let’s face it – parallax scrolling just looks cool. It keeps users engaged, provides an interactive feel to a design, and overall keeps visitors on a page longer, which in turn can increase conversions.

Unleashed Technologies describes parallax scrolling as a technique that takes “the user experience to a new interactive level of online viewing.” Used in a story-like layout, parallax is a solution for web designers in creating websites that are more appealing to visitors.

Examples of Parallax.

The Sony store website shows just how creative you can get with parallax scrolling. When you create a parallax scrolling site with Webydo’s professional design studio, keep in mind the techniques used on the Sony Be Moved page. It begins with an introduction to the story of their company, and as viewers scroll down through the site, the story unfolds via parallax.

While scrolling, the parts of a Sony product “float” together to show how the technology came to be. The interesting part is that one funky part is thrown in, such as the lollipop mixed in with the parts that make up Sony’s mobile phone camera lens attachment. Users can click the + button to read interesting tidbits. It’s little extras like these that really make a site unique.

Site speed and mobile problems.

Two negatives of parallax involve mobile compatibility and site speed. Fortunately, Webydo’s parallax animator is optimized for quick load speed and mobile compatibility, so users don’t have to worry about these aspects.

And Sony shows another way that designers can further speed up a website: it does not try to keep all of the content on a single page. Its menu at the top of the page leads to product pages, an easy aspect Webydo users can also implement.

SEO and usability problems.

Two more complaints of parallax scrolling designs are poor SEO and usability. SEO problems are usually due to designers simply leaving this consideration out of a design, which is why Webydo makes it easy to include important SEO factors like meta-tags.

To avoid usability issues, simply use Webydo’s advanced design suite to add in factors such as chapter buttons. Sony kept the buttons inconspicuous – descriptions only pop open when users hover the mouse over each chapter button.

Is it just a fad or here to stay?

The difference between a fad and trend is that a fad passes quickly but a trend remains for more than just a season. Parallax Scrolling has been in web design for a while now, which is a good indicator that it’s here to stay.

It is true that parallax is an intimidating design style to learn, especially with no code experience. But this is why so many designers are taking up the chance to create their clients websites with Webydo’s code-free parallax scrolling animator. One designer even created a Game of Thrones teaser site for “Death Is Coming”. Now the possibilities are limitless, so you can create your site today with Webydo and join the growing community of 95K professional designers around the world who designing with Webydo.

This article is presented by Webydo’s community of professional designers.



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Registration Summer School is now open!

Roll up! Roll up! South London’s Registration Summer School is now open!

Three days of design lead workshops, lectures, performances and social activities from a selection of design professionals including Sebastian Zimmerhackl and Anthony Burrill alongside the brilliant Hato Press Studio.

Set in a disused primary school, in the Borough of Lewisham Registration is out to deliver experiential education methods that seek to give insight and inspire students. I chatted to Ross Bennett, one of the brains behind the programme to find a little bit more about what’s going on;

How did you come around to putting together Registration?

A friend and recent graduate (Callum Copley) approached myself (Ross Bennett) and Andrew Thorpe, designers who live in South London – with an idea for a summer school. Callum had been to a few different programmes over seas, like ‘After School Club’ in Offenbach, Germany.

Eike König From the studio ‘Hort’ and students from the Offenbach University ran the event in together as a joint project. Callum had a great time and found the collaboration between students and practitioners on such a non-hierarchical level really inspiring. Being surrounded by so many talented students in such short period of time (3 days) and being asked to produce work is an amazing experience.

There wasn’t really anything offering the same kind of fun, free educational structure that we thought there should be over here. So we’re making it happen.

Who should be looking to apply?

You should be interested in approaching subjects from all angles, researching and be open to creative briefs. We don’t want to limit it to Art and design students. But it will probably be past, present or future students that look to get involved in a fun project to challenge their notions of practice.

We want to cultivate a group of multi-practice individuals. We’ll try to make the selected group of students as diverse as possible so that they get the most from each other as well as from the guests that will be delivering workshops, and lectures.

Why the subject of Fear?

After a lot of discussion around whether or not there should be a theme and what it should be we thought it would help the practitioners we were inviting to work from a topic.

As Callum was a recent graduate and as myself and Andrew know only too well University is riddled with fear, just about every human being out there has their share of fears. Be they daily and trivial, or a severe disorder. We feel that fear as a topic isn’t that widely discussed within art and design, especially within education and practice.

We want to open up the theme discuss it without being afraid and maybe think about ways that we can suffer less from it and create work out of it. Across the 3 days and with such a breadth of guests we hope that the theme will be approached from many different perspectives.

What’s in the pipeline for future Registrations?

It’s very easy to start thinking too far into future before things have happened but it would be nice to keep ourselves open to the possibilities of a developed and new programme hopefully with the new network of people we form from this first registration.

It would be great to take on residencies in unused schools during their summer breaks. And definitely to keep working on projects that open up alternative education methods and maintain an element of fun and remain social at their core.

- – -

Registration Summer School - Open from the 19th to the 21st of August

Find more on Registration at: www.registrationschool.co.uk



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Hi-Response Competition – Closed

[EDIT] This competition is now closed.

So, you still haven’t got around to that long overdue portfolio refresh? Good. You’ll be glad you waited as we’ve got 3 free licenses for the pretty freaking amazing Hi-Response, a truly modular WordPress theme.

Created by Emil Olsson, Hi-Response is optimised for portfolio and blog sites in the need of a flexible template. The theme allows control over pretty much everything from layout, colors, typography and interaction making it easy to stand out (without the need to code!).

Some of the FFF team already use Hi-Response and love it, so we think you will too.

If you fancy your chances of winning a Hi-Response license simply Follow @FormFiftyFive & and tweet using this link.

The competition closes on Monday June 2014 at 23:59 GMT. We’ll choose the winners at random from Twitter providing the tweet contains the hashtag #HiResponseFFFComp and that you’re following @FormFiftyFive. We’ll announce the winners shortly after closing date. Winners will be contacted via Twitter and mentioned in this post.

Best of luck.



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PageLayers competiton—closed

We’ve got 7 free copies of the awesome layered PSD website screen gabbing app PageLayers to give away to you, our readers.

If you’ve never come across PageLayers, give it an URL and it’ll parses through the HTML code and output a layered version of the site in a full editable PSD format. If you’re on a newer version of Photoshop (CS5+) it’ll even give you text as editable layers and vector objects. Very helpful indeed.

We’ve been using PageLayers for a while and we absolutely love it, having saved us countless hours of tediously rebuilding websites for visuals and redesigns.

If you fancy your chances and winning a copy of of PageLayers then here’s how to enter.

Follow @formfiftyfive (if you don’t already) and tweet us the following phrase (make sure the hashtag #PageLayersFFFComp is included).

We’re giving away 7 copies of @PageLayers because we love it so much. Follow @FormFiftyFive & RT for your chance to win. #PageLayersFFFComp (Clicking the link to tweet).

Best of luck.

This competition is now closed.

And the winners are… @Lilesey @JakeHob @Lee_Fairhurst @jpryordesign @mattwicke @marcus_mccabe @njacksondesign.

Thank you to everyone who entered. It’s great to see so many other people love PageLayers as much as we do. Commiseration to those who didn’t win this time.

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Getting to know; Bread Collective

East London design collective Bread have been working together since 2011. Creating a wide variety of projects that range from adorning artwork across London’s most iconic architecture to collaborating on their own Lacoste boot.

Oh and for our Hackney based readers, some of you might recognise their very special ‘The Walls Have Ears” mural that spread for 100 metre’s around Hackney Wick, the leading walk to the Olympic Park in East London.

I caught up with Luke from Bread to find out a little bit more about the past and the future…

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Chatter

Great guys. Been to a few of their talks and bought pretty much every book!..

But they look a bit like Phil & Grant in the picture above. ;)

petemandotnet on Review: Shaughnessy x Brook

A beautiful film. Very inspiring and insightful.

Ryan B (@capercailrunner) on Welcome to Union Glacier

what yr was it published

d on Counter-Print: Animal Logo

May I say it is a Motion Graphics. How nice to be continued. Color and Theme remarkable.

bijutoha on Saving Harry

Beautiful work.

ALEX GREEN on Tom Haugomat

williamcolley – Id take a punt on ITC Clearface

Simon Hodgkinson on Rifle: Makeshift Magazine

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