FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1506 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1178 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 69 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 318 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 124 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 70 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 24 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 15 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 4 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

Looking for something?

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Categories rowsEverything Interviews Books Events Jobs

Features


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Studio of the week: Anagrama

Anagrama.

Err wow.

I can’t remember the last time a studio’s new portfolio stood out so well from the pack. With a consistent roll of exceptional looking work from branding to type , digital through to print, Monterrey and Mexico City based Anagrama is well and truly our studio of the week. (If not the month).

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Pixel Perfect Precision Guide

Today digital product studio ustwo have launched the 3rd iteration of their popular Pixel Perfect Precision Guide (try and say that fast 3 times) to help designers become pixel perfect. We had the chance to get an exclusive interview with Matt Gypps at ustwo about the latest PP3.

FFF — Perhaps you’d like to start by introducing ustwo’s Pixel Perfect Precision Guide to those who haven’t have not yet heard of the project.

MG — In brief, it’s a learning tool to give designers the knowledge they need to create work in the digital area. It was originally created four years ago to address some common mistakes that were cropping up at a pixel-level, but since then its scope has widened to encompass much of what we have to think about on a day-to-day basis here at the studio. Although we use it internally to share knowledge around, we’re also really keen to get that knowledge out there into the public domain, especially to students and others who are new to the field.

The PPP Guide already seems to be very detailed and extensive. What did you guys learn to improve on the previous version?

Although the most obvious thing is the new content, such as the Design and Development chapter, this tends to be documenting our existing processes that we’ve been refining over the years, or adding new hints and tips we find. The two areas that we’ve spent the most time on have been the studio’s rebranding, and how that impacts products such as the handbook, and also the copy inside. A lot of pages hadn’t been edited since they were originally created, so many of them have had been smoothed out to read better.

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The Great Discontent Magazine

The Great Discontent, one of the web’s finest creative editorial providers have launched their plans to create their first physical magazine.

The magazine will be a gorgeous, full color piece around 240 pages. It will feature 15 interviews with individuals who have also taken leaps, including Sara Blake, Scott and Vik Harrison of charity: water, James Victore, Zack Arias, Elle Luna, Ike Edeani, Debbie Millman, Joshua Davis, and more! Select interviews will include updates and/or commentary, and we might throw in a surprise or two.

Personally, I always seem keen to promote a good Kickstarter but never end up donating any cash, yet this project has come as a breath of fresh air. Something that will not only be a nice thing to own, but have as a real purpose within creative community. Alongside all that, the concept of the publication feels really close to previous projects I’ve tried but failed with in terms of launching publications with no budget, no savings and no funding.

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Ken Briggs: 1931-2013

Graphic designer Ken Briggs sadly passed last December. One of Britain’s great often unvisited graphic designer’s of the 60′s and 70′s. Famed for his work alongside Sue Chennell for Britain’s National Theatre during the 60′s, Brigg’s take on modernism stood out from the norm within poster and signage design.

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Resident Advisor refresh from Soon_

Renowned digital music channel Resident Advisor have just launched their redesign for 2014, the first since it’s birth back in 2001.

Aside from becoming fully responsive with a dedicated, and much needed mobile site – navigating around RA is now much clearer and cleaner. Artist pages feel easier to discover and profiles for promoters and their line ups feel like a real hub of information, great for discovering new music or wading through current favourites. Editorial plays a big part in Resident’s stronghold and the new site really let’s it’s content breath, yet it feels like there’s room for improvement in this area, not just from a layout perspective but with additional, more engaging additional content too.

I sat down with Fred Flade, Creative Director and Founding Partner at SOON_ who are responsible for the re-design:

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Interview with Ken Wong, artist & designer of Monument Valley

Ahead of the release of their stunning new game Monument Valley, we speak to ustwo‘s Ken Wong about how a project like this comes to fruition. Click through to the post to read the interview in full and get an exclusive chance to sign up for the Monument Valley beta.

Watch the video in HD 

Hi Ken, would you mind briefly introducing yourself to our readers?

Howdy! My name is Ken Wong, and I’m a video game artist and designer at ustwo. Last year I made an iPhone game called Hackycat, in Australia. The year before that I art directed a game where Alice battles Wonderland, in Shanghai. This year I’m in London and I’m designing a game about geometry, architecture and forgiveness.

What can you tell us about your latest project Monument Valley?

Monument Valley originated from wanting to make a game where architecture was the main character. It’s a surreal exploration through fantastical architecture and impossible geometry where the player guides Ida through mysterious monuments, uncovering hidden paths, unfolding optical illusions and outsmarting the enigmatic Crow People.

Monument Valley is a beautiful, exploratory experience, somewhere between exploring a toyshop and reading The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe.

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Interview: OFFF founder Héctor Ayuso

In preparation of the OFFF digital media festival in May 2014 we are launching a series of interviews with selected speakers from the event. To kick things off we spoke to OFFF founder Héctor Ayuso about some of the challenges he faced organising the festival.

Hello Héctor, would you mind briefly introducing yourself to our readers.

Introducing yourself must be the trickiest thing you could do, but well I’m Héctor Ayuso, I’m a curator and OFFF Festival’s founder and director, also known for a huge Sigur Ros fanatic that owns thousands of blu-rays back at home. Hope that sums it up!

I read somewhere that you came up with the idea for the OFFF and launched it that same day. What was the biggest challenge organising that first event?

That is true, and I can never count the times someone has asked me this question and I really hope every time my answer will influence most of the people out there with a strong passion to do something. Basically the biggest challenge I have ever faced is the fact that I had no previous experiences in such things and I had no idea what I was doing. I had a passion to do create something new, a place where people could gather, meet and get inspired by the awesome talents we have out there. I would say that I probably lost a lot of money in my first event, but that only taught me something new every year. And once you have a strong will to do something, you fall, you pick yourself up and you basically learn how to do it better each time.

We’re all glad you persisted! What would your one piece of advice be to someone who is thinking of organising a talk or event.

If you want to do something, just do it, go all the way till the end until you achieve that goal. And that’s the main reason OFFF has been going on for its 14th edition now. Another important piece of advice: don’t think about the event’s profits, don’t organise something focusing on the money that you will make or any such thing. Focus on your audience and give them something that will change their life and this will give you the opportunity of success.

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Competition — 15/115

To celebrate the launch of 15/115 – the second book from Graphic Designer Mark Bloom, better know as Mash Creative, we are giving away a signed copy and an exclusive print!

The book features 115 projects spanning Mark’s 15 year career to date and is divided into three chapters: Posters, Logos & Case studies. It’s beautifully printed on a tactile mix of GFSmith papers. With a white foiled cover, thread sewn spine for lay-flat spreads and fluorescent orange ink to help break up the sections, showing a great care for detail. No decent designers bookshelf should be missing a copy!

And as a special treat we also throwing in a signed Grid Effiency poster Mark designed for Dixon Baxi’s Join The Dot series. There are only 10 of these fluorescent green A2 poster in existence and they have never been made available to buy.

To enter the competition…

Simply tell us what you think is the most significant branding design project of the past 15 years. Tweet your answer and tag it #FFFifteen, leave a comment on our Facebook page or comment below before 9th August 2013.

Good luck!

– Available to buy at This is our shop for £22.50.



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Interview: Jeffrey Bowman

This week we launched out latest interactive masthead collaboration with Jeffrey Bowman. We had a chance to chat to the illustrator and designer, who left the UK for a log cabin in the Norwegian country side, to ask him about his new surroundings and how he had to adapt his working process.

Hi Jeffrey, can you tell us a little about where you are these days and what lead you to Norway.

At the moment I’m based in a place called Hemsedal, which is a mountain village about 4 hours north of Oslo. It’s a pretty incredible place, based around an active outdoor lifestyle. In winter it’s Norway’s snowboard capital and in summer it turns into a hive of outdoor activities from climbing, hiking, fishing, camping, downhill mountain biking and so much more. It’s a super chilled place with a really easy pace of life, which is one of the reasons I ended up here.   One of my students from my time at Shillington College lives here, so I came out to visit last summer. I love the mountains and being outdoors, hiking, climbing and snowboarding and the lifestyle that goes with it, so when I came to visit for 3 weeks I fell in love with the place. I was really sad to leave after my trip, it was like I’d found my second home, so I decided that it was a lifestyle I wanted, so packed up and moved here in January.   Everything is possible here, in summer the 19 hours of sunlight means you can do so much with each day, we call them ‘double days’. I go to the studio do 5-6 hours of work and then head out to explore. Winter is different the daylight is around 5-6 hours and its down to -25 for a lot of the time so you spend your time between boarding and working.   And if I’m honest I really got wore down by the city and the 8-6 everyday, I never felt like I had a life, it got tipped way out of balance, juggling a full-time teaching job and freelance. Plus dealing with the daily encounters of Manchester. I loved my time there and the people I met, but city life can be tough and ugly, so I opted out. I still have dreams or ‘nightmares’ of being back in a city and not being able to get back to Norway haha. At the moment I do feel like I’ll be sticking here for a few years, it’s the right lifestyle for me. I’ve swapped sirens for the sweet bird sounds and the chavs for mountains.

What’s your new work space like?

I work in a log cabin called ‘Igloo’. It’s in the village centre, set up as a shared studio space by Anki Grothe (photographer) and Mari Soderholm (graphic design and former student of mine). It’s a really cool space, it’s as authentic as you can get! I love working down here, I think anyone freelancing needs a space to work, and for me it’s the dream I’ve always had, a cabin tucked away in the mountains.   The creative community here is really strong so people come by to work from here a lot, and we have regular exhibitions from local creatives. There is a good sense of community and it’s building stronger as we go. 

What are you currently working on?

I’ve just finished the cover of issue 15 of The Albion BMX magazine (it should have been issue 13 but it got put back and added too quite a lot), it’s been quite a ride doing that and I’m super stoked to see it finished. It’s 15 famous BMX spots from around the world made into one crazy ‘dream’ spot! I’m also working on more promo material and branding for Sheffield Uni. Also a range of longboard and decks for a Brazilian skate company and off the back of that I think I’ll be re-branding them too. And I’m also working on a ton of other small branding projects including Sim Warren who is a videographer, working on graphics and branding for his video ’64 Days’ which documents his trip through the national parks of America filming the wildlife and mountains.   And as always I have personal projects I’m working on, one of which i’m currently in talks with to produce a book all being well.

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POINT Conference – Review

David Hieatt talks about his new company Hiut Denim. Photograph ©Davy Jones 2013.

At the beginning of May we attended London’s latest design conference POINT. Boasting some big names from the design world including, Erik SpiekermannMorag MyerscoughJonathan Barnbrook and video interviews from Alan Fletcher and Milton Glaser the bar was already being set pretty high. POINT took place over two days at Royal Institute of British Architects in London’s west end, the choice of venue (with it’s wooden panelled theatre walls, grand entrance stair cases and architectural-orientated bookshops) and list of speakers set an intellectual and academic tone to the conference.

With just one theatre for all the speakers there was a lot of speakers to get through in both days. For the most part this meant short 30 minute talks in order to stick to a tight formal schedule which kept talks concise and focused. Unfortunately this didn’t leave much time for questions both from the live audience or via Twitter. As both days progressed speakers towards the end of the day were given hour long slots which, for the like of Morag Myerscough and Matt Webb gave the audience a much deeper insight into their work.

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Steer – a novice’s review

Some of you may remember last month’s Steer feature, where we introduced the London-based team of developers and designers, who aimed to teach people to code. From scratch. In one week.

It was Steer’s one week commitment that most intrigued us, so we sent FFF’er Jack Daly – a complete coding novice – to check out the course and report back.

Find out how he got on…

Day 1

After a 3.30AM rise to make the Glasgow to London sleepless train I had been a little worried that a lack of Z’s might leave me a off the pace for the day ahead – those fears were only compounded when the train ground to a standstill for an hour, meaning I wouldn’t make the 10am class start.

I needn’t have worried.

Even turning up a full hour after the class began, the Steer team made sure I didn’t miss out. Rik went through the various lessons at a pace everyone could keep up with, and even though i’d missed the start Tim was straight on hand with one-on-one tuition to cover everything i’d previously missed. By lunch I was fully up to speed.

On the first day – and throughout the week – everyone was well fed and watered, with a variety of fresh fruit, pastries and nibbles available, before a lunch of salad’s, wraps and sandwiches. There was also a steady flow of tea and coffee.

The first morning was spent going through the basics of HTML or “the bones of the internet”. We learnt how to structure basic content, into head and body, while bringing hierarchy to our typography with headers, paragraphs and a variety of listing code, before introducing links, images and video content. Finally dealing with meta tags to ensure our sites links would be best represented in Google, Facebook and Twitter. Read more



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Emma

This is the best thing I’ve ever seen.

Emma on F-Bombs for Feminism

So good thanks.

otomatikkapi on Miika Saksi

Wow, this work is incredible.

Luchia Bloomfield on Telegramme Paper Co.

Pete! Nice one :) lovely work let’s catch up soon! Jo

Jo on Peter Clarkson

Huge fan of Stanley’s work for a long long time… inspirational.

Petemandotnet on Stanley Chow

Beautifully designed book. I read it too and while I’m also not the target audience, I enjoyed it nonetheless. She has a tone of voice in her writing that is hard not to like.

Luchia Bloomfield on Review: Kate Moross / Make Your Own Luck

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