FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1493 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1174 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 66 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 318 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 124 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 69 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 24 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 15 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 4 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

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Categories rowsEverything Interviews Books Events Jobs

Interviews

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Welcome to the world of Omnisense

This week I came across a website that offered one of the most immersive interactive experiences I have witnessed online this far. The Omnisense website markets an imaginary product called O+ and will guide you through the calibration process and initial test of the product. It makes use of your smartphone as a second screen and controller to guide you through a slightly gruesome scenario in the not to distant future.

I thought it might be a hoax site for a big budget movie but it turned out to be a final year student project. Intrigued I spoke to Florian Morel about Omnisense to find out more…

Hi Florian, would you mind telling us a little more about the Omnisense project?

Sure, Omnisense emerged from a general theme; The perception of our world and the enhancement of our senses.

We use our senses to gather informations from our world, but little by little we contribute to the birth of a new world. A digital world, containing information about everything: locations (like google maps), what you like (pinterest), who your friends are (facebook), where you work (linkedin), what you know (wikipedia), what you don’t know (wikileaks). It is becoming more and more a duplicate of our world. This digital environment grows more and more each day but we’re not equipped to interact with it.

However we use some devices such as smartphones which become kind of a body extension, allowing us to access this digital world.

What if you could access these data without the need for such a device ? What if we could get a new sense suited for this digital world? With this background in mind, how would all this personal data affect our life and our judgement?

In the end, it’s all about current problems (personal data on the web) and how to talk about a serious topic in a engaging and immersive way.

Some references that inspired us were: Google Glass, Trask and Weyland Industries, Black Mirror, The Wolf Among Us, transhumanism & body hacking (“L’Humanité augmentée” – Augmented humanity, by Eric Sadin, and “L’être et l’écran” – The being and the screen, by Stéphane Vial).

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Interview: Frank Chimero on Another Studio

Until June this year, designer Frank Chimero worked under his own name. A lot of us designers do this and just as many will find a suitable moniker to work under. It is a question that I struggled with over the past year. In the end decided to ditch my company name in favour of my own.

When I read that Frank was starting a studio called Another I thought it would be a great opportunity to get his thoughts on the topic.

Hi Frank, first of all can you tell us a little more about Another Studio?

Another is my one-man design studio focused on taking the knowledge and conventions of digital and bringing them back to print (and vice versa). Projects come in one of two forms: I handle everything and work closely with the client like a traditional studio, or I plug into the client’s internal design and dev team to help shepherd along a project. It’s a lifestyle business—meaning it’s primary reason for existence is to act as a little Frank-powered machine to contribute good things to culture and help me have the life I want to live.

So you’ll continue with your personal work under your own name?

Yes! Working under a studio name leaves my personal name free for my books, writing, and other artistic pursuits.

Do you feel that a company name will open other doors than working as Frank Chimero?

Of course, otherwise there’d be no reason to do it. I suppose the day-to-day looks a lot like my work days from the past few years, but I decided to formalize the endeavor to leave some room for collaborations and to not have to stick to the aesthetic people have come to expect from me. Read more



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Registration Summer School is now open!

Roll up! Roll up! South London’s Registration Summer School is now open!

Three days of design lead workshops, lectures, performances and social activities from a selection of design professionals including Sebastian Zimmerhackl and Anthony Burrill alongside the brilliant Hato Press Studio.

Set in a disused primary school, in the Borough of Lewisham Registration is out to deliver experiential education methods that seek to give insight and inspire students. I chatted to Ross Bennett, one of the brains behind the programme to find a little bit more about what’s going on;

How did you come around to putting together Registration?

A friend and recent graduate (Callum Copley) approached myself (Ross Bennett) and Andrew Thorpe, designers who live in South London – with an idea for a summer school. Callum had been to a few different programmes over seas, like ‘After School Club’ in Offenbach, Germany.

Eike König From the studio ‘Hort’ and students from the Offenbach University ran the event in together as a joint project. Callum had a great time and found the collaboration between students and practitioners on such a non-hierarchical level really inspiring. Being surrounded by so many talented students in such short period of time (3 days) and being asked to produce work is an amazing experience.

There wasn’t really anything offering the same kind of fun, free educational structure that we thought there should be over here. So we’re making it happen.

Who should be looking to apply?

You should be interested in approaching subjects from all angles, researching and be open to creative briefs. We don’t want to limit it to Art and design students. But it will probably be past, present or future students that look to get involved in a fun project to challenge their notions of practice.

We want to cultivate a group of multi-practice individuals. We’ll try to make the selected group of students as diverse as possible so that they get the most from each other as well as from the guests that will be delivering workshops, and lectures.

Why the subject of Fear?

After a lot of discussion around whether or not there should be a theme and what it should be we thought it would help the practitioners we were inviting to work from a topic.

As Callum was a recent graduate and as myself and Andrew know only too well University is riddled with fear, just about every human being out there has their share of fears. Be they daily and trivial, or a severe disorder. We feel that fear as a topic isn’t that widely discussed within art and design, especially within education and practice.

We want to open up the theme discuss it without being afraid and maybe think about ways that we can suffer less from it and create work out of it. Across the 3 days and with such a breadth of guests we hope that the theme will be approached from many different perspectives.

What’s in the pipeline for future Registrations?

It’s very easy to start thinking too far into future before things have happened but it would be nice to keep ourselves open to the possibilities of a developed and new programme hopefully with the new network of people we form from this first registration.

It would be great to take on residencies in unused schools during their summer breaks. And definitely to keep working on projects that open up alternative education methods and maintain an element of fun and remain social at their core.

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Registration Summer School - Open from the 19th to the 21st of August

Find more on Registration at: www.registrationschool.co.uk




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Interview: Shepard Fairy

Love him or hate him, you can’t deny that Frank Shepard Fairey one of today’s most infamous and perhaps most influential american street artists. You’ll likely know him for his “Andre the Giant Has a Posse” or OBEY sticker campaign, in which he appropriated images from a supermarket tabloid. If not then you will have definitely have come across his poster for the Obama election campaign which caused a mixed reaction in the press for it’s message as well as for the it’s legal issues.

Film maker Brett Novak recently shot this short interview with Shepard Fairey in which he discusses the themes and messages around his work as well as explaining the Obey story, giving us fascinating insight into his life.



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Getting to know; Bread Collective

East London design collective Bread have been working together since 2011. Creating a wide variety of projects that range from adorning artwork across London’s most iconic architecture to collaborating on their own Lacoste boot.

Oh and for our Hackney based readers, some of you might recognise their very special ‘The Walls Have Ears” mural that spread for 100 metre’s around Hackney Wick, the leading walk to the Olympic Park in East London.

I caught up with Luke from Bread to find out a little bit more about the past and the future…

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Getting to know; Elana Schlenker

It’s no easy job finding someone who publishes great work under the description of ‘typographic smut’. But lucky for us, we managed to find someone who does – introducing, graphic design extraordinaire; Elana Schlenker.

Aside from the smut, entitled ‘Gratuitous Type‘ Schlenker owns an outstanding book of work ranging from print to identity with pieces for digital also. As if that wasn’t enough already, way back when in 2013 Elana was added to Print magazine’s New Visual Artist list, a prestigious annual distinction that recognizes the industry’s top 20 creative talents under the age of 30.

We sat down, over the internet mind to find out a little more on where it all began, and what’s coming up next.

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Getting to know Playground Paris

Delving in to who produced the great new portfolio site for Studio Twice unravelled Playground Paris. The studio name for graphic designer Valentin Adam, which was founded back in 2011. With a wide range of great graphic and illustration work covering both print and digital, we were totally sold. Gratefully, I managed to grab a second out of Adam’s exciting schedule to get to know Playground a little better.

How did Playground begin?

Playground begun with a desire to have fun while working. I’ve been a freelancer for 8 years now, mostly working within web & motion design, and my love for typography & colour became stronger and stronger, but I didn’t have the time to play with it. I stopped everything for 2 months, to experiment & have fun with colour and letters, and I decided to create my own playing field, my own playground.

What are you up to at the moment?

What’s good with Playground is that I can work in various fields. I’m now working on some motion graphics for Le Coq Sportif, an identity design for a theatre company, art direction for a record label, an event identity for a design exhibition by Orange, some websites and maybe a book design, soon… I never have the same day, the same demands, the same clients, as I don’t have a special “style” I can have fun searching the good tone for each demand.

What would be your favourite piece from your current portfolio, what are you most proud of?

It’s quite hard, as I love to change as much as possible my work. I would say I like some works in different fields, for example Iconoclast Image’s website, the photos I did for Sosh’s tumblr or maybe the still at-work identity for PlusPlus, but I think Playground is still missing one huge project, which I can decline over identity, print design, posters, web… Read more




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Interview: Sennep at 10

London-based digital studio, Sennep just celebrated it’s tenth birthday — no small feat in an industry which is constantly changing and pushing what’s possible.

We’re long-standing fans of the studio‘s work here at FFF. So we caught up with founder Matt Rice, to hear how things have changed over the last decade and learn more about the studio’s work and approach.

Inside the Sennep studio (illustration Nic Tual)

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Interview with Ken Wong, artist & designer of Monument Valley

Ahead of the release of their stunning new game Monument Valley, we speak to ustwo‘s Ken Wong about how a project like this comes to fruition. Click through to the post to read the interview in full and get an exclusive chance to sign up for the Monument Valley beta.

Watch the video in HD 

Hi Ken, would you mind briefly introducing yourself to our readers?

Howdy! My name is Ken Wong, and I’m a video game artist and designer at ustwo. Last year I made an iPhone game called Hackycat, in Australia. The year before that I art directed a game where Alice battles Wonderland, in Shanghai. This year I’m in London and I’m designing a game about geometry, architecture and forgiveness.

What can you tell us about your latest project Monument Valley?

Monument Valley originated from wanting to make a game where architecture was the main character. It’s a surreal exploration through fantastical architecture and impossible geometry where the player guides Ida through mysterious monuments, uncovering hidden paths, unfolding optical illusions and outsmarting the enigmatic Crow People.

Monument Valley is a beautiful, exploratory experience, somewhere between exploring a toyshop and reading The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe.

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Interview: OFFF founder Héctor Ayuso

In preparation of the OFFF digital media festival in May 2014 we are launching a series of interviews with selected speakers from the event. To kick things off we spoke to OFFF founder Héctor Ayuso about some of the challenges he faced organising the festival.

Hello Héctor, would you mind briefly introducing yourself to our readers.

Introducing yourself must be the trickiest thing you could do, but well I’m Héctor Ayuso, I’m a curator and OFFF Festival’s founder and director, also known for a huge Sigur Ros fanatic that owns thousands of blu-rays back at home. Hope that sums it up!

I read somewhere that you came up with the idea for the OFFF and launched it that same day. What was the biggest challenge organising that first event?

That is true, and I can never count the times someone has asked me this question and I really hope every time my answer will influence most of the people out there with a strong passion to do something. Basically the biggest challenge I have ever faced is the fact that I had no previous experiences in such things and I had no idea what I was doing. I had a passion to do create something new, a place where people could gather, meet and get inspired by the awesome talents we have out there. I would say that I probably lost a lot of money in my first event, but that only taught me something new every year. And once you have a strong will to do something, you fall, you pick yourself up and you basically learn how to do it better each time.

We’re all glad you persisted! What would your one piece of advice be to someone who is thinking of organising a talk or event.

If you want to do something, just do it, go all the way till the end until you achieve that goal. And that’s the main reason OFFF has been going on for its 14th edition now. Another important piece of advice: don’t think about the event’s profits, don’t organise something focusing on the money that you will make or any such thing. Focus on your audience and give them something that will change their life and this will give you the opportunity of success.

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FvF x FFF: Phunk Interview

In our latest Freunde von Freunden interview we gain a rare glimpse into the lives of Singapore contemporary art & design collective PHUNK. Alvin Tan, Jackson Tan, Melvin Chee and William Chan met during their studies at LASALLE College of the Arts and in 1994 PhunkStudio was formed. Sharing one Macintosh in a rented space in Chinatown, the beginnings were rudimentary to say the least. Without anything other than a dream, they drew on each other’s friendship and creative talents to reach for the skies.

Emerging from a creative climate that could best be described as a cultural desert, like their hometown of Singapore, this group have grown, evolved and diversified to seek out new opportunities and create new histories. PHUNK represent a new generation of free-thinkers who are forging new professional pathways. Embracing collaboration, and the, ‘creative meeting of the minds’, their joint efforts have resulted in the establishment of a studio and gallery that works with a range of artists and brands to produce innovative projects.

Each member maintains a different day job while working simultaneously for the collective that informs their approach to PHUNK. Alvin has his own sunglasses line called Mystic Vintage; Jackson works on branding and curatorial projects for various companies; Melvin produces commissioned paintings; and William runs a motion graphics and film production company. While offering a tour of their studio and gallery, they provide some insights into daily life in Singapore and discuss how their ultimate project is always their next collaboration.

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Interview: Jeffrey Bowman

This week we launched out latest interactive masthead collaboration with Jeffrey Bowman. We had a chance to chat to the illustrator and designer, who left the UK for a log cabin in the Norwegian country side, to ask him about his new surroundings and how he had to adapt his working process.

Hi Jeffrey, can you tell us a little about where you are these days and what lead you to Norway.

At the moment I’m based in a place called Hemsedal, which is a mountain village about 4 hours north of Oslo. It’s a pretty incredible place, based around an active outdoor lifestyle. In winter it’s Norway’s snowboard capital and in summer it turns into a hive of outdoor activities from climbing, hiking, fishing, camping, downhill mountain biking and so much more. It’s a super chilled place with a really easy pace of life, which is one of the reasons I ended up here.   One of my students from my time at Shillington College lives here, so I came out to visit last summer. I love the mountains and being outdoors, hiking, climbing and snowboarding and the lifestyle that goes with it, so when I came to visit for 3 weeks I fell in love with the place. I was really sad to leave after my trip, it was like I’d found my second home, so I decided that it was a lifestyle I wanted, so packed up and moved here in January.   Everything is possible here, in summer the 19 hours of sunlight means you can do so much with each day, we call them ‘double days’. I go to the studio do 5-6 hours of work and then head out to explore. Winter is different the daylight is around 5-6 hours and its down to -25 for a lot of the time so you spend your time between boarding and working.   And if I’m honest I really got wore down by the city and the 8-6 everyday, I never felt like I had a life, it got tipped way out of balance, juggling a full-time teaching job and freelance. Plus dealing with the daily encounters of Manchester. I loved my time there and the people I met, but city life can be tough and ugly, so I opted out. I still have dreams or ‘nightmares’ of being back in a city and not being able to get back to Norway haha. At the moment I do feel like I’ll be sticking here for a few years, it’s the right lifestyle for me. I’ve swapped sirens for the sweet bird sounds and the chavs for mountains.

What’s your new work space like?

I work in a log cabin called ‘Igloo’. It’s in the village centre, set up as a shared studio space by Anki Grothe (photographer) and Mari Soderholm (graphic design and former student of mine). It’s a really cool space, it’s as authentic as you can get! I love working down here, I think anyone freelancing needs a space to work, and for me it’s the dream I’ve always had, a cabin tucked away in the mountains.   The creative community here is really strong so people come by to work from here a lot, and we have regular exhibitions from local creatives. There is a good sense of community and it’s building stronger as we go. 

What are you currently working on?

I’ve just finished the cover of issue 15 of The Albion BMX magazine (it should have been issue 13 but it got put back and added too quite a lot), it’s been quite a ride doing that and I’m super stoked to see it finished. It’s 15 famous BMX spots from around the world made into one crazy ‘dream’ spot! I’m also working on more promo material and branding for Sheffield Uni. Also a range of longboard and decks for a Brazilian skate company and off the back of that I think I’ll be re-branding them too. And I’m also working on a ton of other small branding projects including Sim Warren who is a videographer, working on graphics and branding for his video ’64 Days’ which documents his trip through the national parks of America filming the wildlife and mountains.   And as always I have personal projects I’m working on, one of which i’m currently in talks with to produce a book all being well.

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Chatter

Think the title might’ve been misinterpreted. For “shit” read “stuff” or “things” maybe?

Phil Howard on Shit showreels say

This is really good, very funny, especially the ‘to fast to appreciate it…’ bit! I would slightly agree with Jim though. These are all just a collection of treatments/styles and they do work within various contexts. It’s probably a bit …

Chris on Shit showreels say

So watch constitutes ‘not Shit’ exactly? You can’t craft a statement as confident and entertaining as this without so much as a hint of a retort, surely? The fact is that some of these tricks actually do work in certain …

Jim on Shit showreels say

Stunning design and simply lines. Great stuff.

Jai @ DeFrae on Gomez by Savvy Studio

love the illustrations

Jenny Ure on Jane Laurie

Leo on LEGO: Everything is NOT awesome

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