FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1495 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1175 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 66 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 318 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 124 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 69 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 24 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 15 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 4 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

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Royal Copenhagen – Blue & Black Tribute

Two months ago Royal Copenhagen started to make a tribute to the colours black and blue by collaborating with four artists including a musician, a dancer, a photographer and a writer. The fruits of the collaboration were two films, which the 339 year old renowned porcelain company are delighted with.

Credits: Agency: Liquidminds Creative director: Olga Bastian Producer: Rune Hørslev Projectmanager: Mia Skovgaard Sørensen Photographer: Kim Wendt 2. Photographer: David Bauer Stylist: Emilie Dresler Makeup: Mette M Dancers: Patricia Seron Pawlik, Edhem Jesenkovic, Sofia Karlsson Words artist: Claus Ankersen Visual effects: Sacha Wechselmann



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Grilli Type

Super-slick Swiss type foundry Grilli Type (purveyors of fine fonts such as GT Walsheim and GT Haptik) are already looking forward to autumn — along with new weights and extended character sets they’re also releasing two new typefaces: GT Cinetype and GT Eesti. Roll on crispy leaves and fresh .ttf files…

A little from Noël & Thierry on their new releases: GT Cinetype is based on an engineer’s type design for a movie subtitles typeface from the 35mm era. The brute force design is void of any curves — because really, who needs curves anyway? GT Eesti is a revival of Estonia’s most popular typeface from the Soviet era. It oozes with tons of personality. Just look how happy those kids are about the typeface!





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Tangent help design “the most successful” commonwealth games ever

For the last four years Tangent has been responsible for developing the brand for the recent Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games.

After inheriting the logo four years ago the Glasgow-based design studio went on to shape every aspect of the Games brand identity. Early projects included Pictograms, an official typeface, a set of sub-brand logos and the interior graphics for the Organising Committee headquarters. They didn’t stop there, the total of 500 projects also included the Official Ticketing and Spectator Guide. As well as art-directing the TV graphics, and developing the creative strategy for the ‘Look of Games’ – the venue dressing, city dressing and sports equipment at Games-time.



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Glug Birmingham: Midland Masters

With just under a week to go, momentum is building for the first outing of Glug Birmingham on Thursday 21st August. Titled MIDLAND MASTERS, an event curated by Created in Birmingham and Inkygoodness, in association with (the newly rebranded) Glug, is hosted at Fazeley Studios. Riso print programmes for the night have been printed by Hato Press, the poster inside designed by headline speaker Alex Fowkes, with the programme itself designed by Kerry Leslie. We’re looking forward to being there, it promises to be a great night!

The speakers:

PROVIDE (Matt Nation) Starting from the bottom (and we’ll probably be here a while) Hero of Switzerland & FRUKT (Dan Button) Doing a Hobby for a Living Waste Studio (Norm Hayes) Apple P Cuppa Tea Studio Output (Alun Edwards & Chris Allwood) New Challenges Well Made Studio (Gemma Germains) No Friends in Business Alex Fowkes Process is Just as Important as Product

Nine stalls in our pop-up market: Codswallop Collective (Art prints), Brothers of the Stripe (Prints & originals), Working Clasp (Jewellery), Mike Stimpson (Photography), Hero of Switzerland (Art prints), LizzLizz (Comics), PROVIDE (Clothing & Accessories), Bethany Thompson (Art prints), Sam Pierpoint (Handpainted shoes).

Live drawing from Brothers of the Stripe, taking place in the Fazeley Studios courtyard (where you’ll find the BBQ too). Live t-shirt silk-screen printing from Waste Studio. AMMO Magazine special edition launch party. FREE screen print, designed by Alex Fowkes, printed by Whiteduck Screenprint (for the first 100 guests to sign in!) as well as tasty treats from Paisley Immy.

All of this will be taking place at Fazeley Studios, 6pm-11pm. To finish, there’s an after-party at Spot*Light, 10pm-1am.

Tickets are available on eventbrite, priced £7.50 (+ free drink)

A further two events are planned for 20th November (Illustration – speakers include Studio Binky and Florence Blanchard) and 12th March (Digital / Innovation – speakers include Gavin Strange and Jonny Costello).






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The story of Adobe Illustrator

Since 1987 Adobe’s Illustrator program has been an essential tool for almost every graphic designers. It was the first software application for a young company that had, until then, focused solely on Adobe PostScript. Illustrator not only altered Adobe’s course, it changed drawing and graphic design forever.





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THE NEAR FUTURE OF IN-CAR human–machine interfaces

Over the last few weeks London’s ustwo have published a detailed analysis of the future of in-car human–machine interfaces or HMI. It makes for an incredibly interesting read even if you have very little to do with the automotive industry. A lot of their findings can be applied to user interface design in many other fields.

Make sure you check it out.

For those of you with little time, read this TL;DR summary packing the 5 long articles into 5 easily digestible points…

1. Lose the ‘stick a touchscreen on it’ approach

2. Love the user/driver

3. Less is more in a UX sense

4. Little things count in a UI/visual sense

5. Listen up and get a feel for emerging technologies with the most potential

The good guys at ustwo have made this entire article available as a PDF designed to be read as an e-book on iPad – which you can download for free.



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The Office of Craig Oldham: Interview

I caught up with Craig Oldham to discuss his recent work for D&AD‘s New Blood Awards, which draws together the organisation’s previous Student Awards, Graduate Academy, and New Blood Exhibition, aiming to create a simpler structure that encourages more young people to enter the scheme.  You can see some his picks from the 700+ portfolios represented here.

A series of infographics were created, on which Craig worked with copywriter and collaborating creative director John Goddard. Speaking to Creative Review, Craig explained – “Once we’d got the main content plotted out, we realised just how massive the whole thing was, which was when we started to get excited about it – I think at the back of our minds we wanted to create the world’s biggest flow-chart. The whole point of a flow diagram is that you can use it to illustrate anything. You can diverge, and branch off. There are no limits to what you can do with it, which is as much of a curse as it is blessing,”

You’re a vocal advocate of D&AD and design education in general, whats your history and current relationship with D&AD? 

I’ve been involved with D&AD in many capacities throughout the years. I exhibited in the New Blood exhibition when I graduated, I went to an agency where Ben Casey was involved in D&AD and where getting in-book was a major deal in the awards season, and from those early beginnings I’ve done pretty much everything they’ve ever asked of me—but not because of anything more than a shared belief. I was always aware of the awards—as everyone is—but they invest all that back into education and that’s what I believe in, and what has kept my relationship with them for all these years. Education is what matters to me. It can be the most rewarding and powerful thing you can share. And D&AD and I share that value system.

I was at the wrap of the New Blood Academy last week (where graduates in the New Blood Programme get a 2 week ‘bootcamp’ effectively), and speaking to the graduates involved and how much better and optimistic they feel on trying to get a first foothold in the industry than before is really powerful stuff.

When I think of the OOCO I don’t traditionally associate you with installation / exhibition design. How did you find working to such a scale? Is this the sort of work you’d like to be doing more of?

To be honest, I’ve had previous experiences working in all that scale on a lot of projects past and present. It’s different but certainly not daunting. I like it as you get to operate physically from the beginning and it adds an extra dimension to the way you have to think. I get a kick out of production, the physicality and the assembly of things, the fabrication, materials, scales and methods etc. are heightened in installation and exhibitions. Don’t get me wrong, they’re as important (if nor more) in the more 2-D medias like books and the likes, but more things can go west so you have to think a bit differently.

I always love designing spaces and things to go within spaces. It’s not a different way of thinking, just a different way of doing.

Working with a copywriter sounds like the traditional Art&Copy model, but you’re also quite the wordsmith (swear-smith?) and John (Goddard) is also a creative director – how collaborative was the process of writing and designing together?

It’s quite a flip-flop to be honest. John, besides being technically a copywriter, is a really visual person and often arms his ideas with a strong visual or aesthetic sensibility. He’s not there to simply write things or make sense of my sweary, garbled notes, but be a good art director too. And likewise I’m not just here for the pictures. I’ve never been a sketcher and always written ideas or talked them to a conclusion so generally we work extremely well together and alternate between the two. John’s words and I’m pictures, and I’m words and he’s pictures. And that relationships helps us get to a really good point. Plus we get on very well and laugh—a hell of a lot—which is important (and tends to be our yardstick for the quality of a project).

What’s next for OOCO? Anything in the pipeline you can share…

I’m working on the next book which I’ve curated and produced. It’s a different one to the Hand.Written.Letter.Project or The Democratic Lecture, but will be produced to the same standards and cover a theme I’ve always been interested in. This tome is a celebration of the intelligence, wit, humour and innate creativity of the working class. It’s a political book of graphic works from the seemingly ordinary person who can create the most extraordinarily powerful things. Alongside works from from an acclaimed film director, a Turner Prize winning artist, a YBA artist, will be stuff from my Dad and many many “amateur” creatives… bet you can’t wait for the press release on that one!




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Chatter

Think the title might’ve been misinterpreted. For “shit” read “stuff” or “things” maybe?

Phil Howard on Shit showreels say

This is really good, very funny, especially the ‘to fast to appreciate it…’ bit! I would slightly agree with Jim though. These are all just a collection of treatments/styles and they do work within various contexts. It’s probably a bit …

Chris on Shit showreels say

So watch constitutes ‘not Shit’ exactly? You can’t craft a statement as confident and entertaining as this without so much as a hint of a retort, surely? The fact is that some of these tricks actually do work in certain …

Jim on Shit showreels say

Stunning design and simply lines. Great stuff.

Jai @ DeFrae on Gomez by Savvy Studio

love the illustrations

Jenny Ure on Jane Laurie

Leo on LEGO: Everything is NOT awesome

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