FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1498 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1175 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 66 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 318 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 124 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 69 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 24 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 15 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 4 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

Looking for something?

FFFxOFFF
Teaser trailer

Categories rowsEverything Interviews Books Events Jobs



next

The story of Adobe Illustrator

Since 1987 Adobe’s Illustrator program has been an essential tool for almost every graphic designers. It was the first software application for a young company that had, until then, focused solely on Adobe PostScript. Illustrator not only altered Adobe’s course, it changed drawing and graphic design forever.





next

Interview: Frank Chimero on Another Studio

Until June this year, designer Frank Chimero worked under his own name. A lot of us designers do this and just as many will find a suitable moniker to work under. It is a question that I struggled with over the past year. In the end decided to ditch my company name in favour of my own.

When I read that Frank was starting a studio called Another I thought it would be a great opportunity to get his thoughts on the topic.

Hi Frank, first of all can you tell us a little more about Another Studio?

Another is my one-man design studio focused on taking the knowledge and conventions of digital and bringing them back to print (and vice versa). Projects come in one of two forms: I handle everything and work closely with the client like a traditional studio, or I plug into the client’s internal design and dev team to help shepherd along a project. It’s a lifestyle business—meaning it’s primary reason for existence is to act as a little Frank-powered machine to contribute good things to culture and help me have the life I want to live.

So you’ll continue with your personal work under your own name?

Yes! Working under a studio name leaves my personal name free for my books, writing, and other artistic pursuits.

Do you feel that a company name will open other doors than working as Frank Chimero?

Of course, otherwise there’d be no reason to do it. I suppose the day-to-day looks a lot like my work days from the past few years, but I decided to formalize the endeavor to leave some room for collaborations and to not have to stick to the aesthetic people have come to expect from me. Read more



next

THE NEAR FUTURE OF IN-CAR human–machine interfaces

Over the last few weeks London’s ustwo have published a detailed analysis of the future of in-car human–machine interfaces or HMI. It makes for an incredibly interesting read even if you have very little to do with the automotive industry. A lot of their findings can be applied to user interface design in many other fields.

Make sure you check it out.

For those of you with little time, read this TL;DR summary packing the 5 long articles into 5 easily digestible points…

1. Lose the ‘stick a touchscreen on it’ approach

2. Love the user/driver

3. Less is more in a UX sense

4. Little things count in a UI/visual sense

5. Listen up and get a feel for emerging technologies with the most potential

The good guys at ustwo have made this entire article available as a PDF designed to be read as an e-book on iPad – which you can download for free.



next

The Office of Craig Oldham: Interview

I caught up with Craig Oldham to discuss his recent work for D&AD‘s New Blood Awards, which draws together the organisation’s previous Student Awards, Graduate Academy, and New Blood Exhibition, aiming to create a simpler structure that encourages more young people to enter the scheme.  You can see some his picks from the 700+ portfolios represented here.

A series of infographics were created, on which Craig worked with copywriter and collaborating creative director John Goddard. Speaking to Creative Review, Craig explained – “Once we’d got the main content plotted out, we realised just how massive the whole thing was, which was when we started to get excited about it – I think at the back of our minds we wanted to create the world’s biggest flow-chart. The whole point of a flow diagram is that you can use it to illustrate anything. You can diverge, and branch off. There are no limits to what you can do with it, which is as much of a curse as it is blessing,”

You’re a vocal advocate of D&AD and design education in general, whats your history and current relationship with D&AD? 

I’ve been involved with D&AD in many capacities throughout the years. I exhibited in the New Blood exhibition when I graduated, I went to an agency where Ben Casey was involved in D&AD and where getting in-book was a major deal in the awards season, and from those early beginnings I’ve done pretty much everything they’ve ever asked of me—but not because of anything more than a shared belief. I was always aware of the awards—as everyone is—but they invest all that back into education and that’s what I believe in, and what has kept my relationship with them for all these years. Education is what matters to me. It can be the most rewarding and powerful thing you can share. And D&AD and I share that value system.

I was at the wrap of the New Blood Academy last week (where graduates in the New Blood Programme get a 2 week ‘bootcamp’ effectively), and speaking to the graduates involved and how much better and optimistic they feel on trying to get a first foothold in the industry than before is really powerful stuff.

When I think of the OOCO I don’t traditionally associate you with installation / exhibition design. How did you find working to such a scale? Is this the sort of work you’d like to be doing more of?

To be honest, I’ve had previous experiences working in all that scale on a lot of projects past and present. It’s different but certainly not daunting. I like it as you get to operate physically from the beginning and it adds an extra dimension to the way you have to think. I get a kick out of production, the physicality and the assembly of things, the fabrication, materials, scales and methods etc. are heightened in installation and exhibitions. Don’t get me wrong, they’re as important (if nor more) in the more 2-D medias like books and the likes, but more things can go west so you have to think a bit differently.

I always love designing spaces and things to go within spaces. It’s not a different way of thinking, just a different way of doing.

Working with a copywriter sounds like the traditional Art&Copy model, but you’re also quite the wordsmith (swear-smith?) and John (Goddard) is also a creative director – how collaborative was the process of writing and designing together?

It’s quite a flip-flop to be honest. John, besides being technically a copywriter, is a really visual person and often arms his ideas with a strong visual or aesthetic sensibility. He’s not there to simply write things or make sense of my sweary, garbled notes, but be a good art director too. And likewise I’m not just here for the pictures. I’ve never been a sketcher and always written ideas or talked them to a conclusion so generally we work extremely well together and alternate between the two. John’s words and I’m pictures, and I’m words and he’s pictures. And that relationships helps us get to a really good point. Plus we get on very well and laugh—a hell of a lot—which is important (and tends to be our yardstick for the quality of a project).

What’s next for OOCO? Anything in the pipeline you can share…

I’m working on the next book which I’ve curated and produced. It’s a different one to the Hand.Written.Letter.Project or The Democratic Lecture, but will be produced to the same standards and cover a theme I’ve always been interested in. This tome is a celebration of the intelligence, wit, humour and innate creativity of the working class. It’s a political book of graphic works from the seemingly ordinary person who can create the most extraordinarily powerful things. Alongside works from from an acclaimed film director, a Turner Prize winning artist, a YBA artist, will be stuff from my Dad and many many “amateur” creatives… bet you can’t wait for the press release on that one!




next

Spin launches a new portfolio

The London design studio Spin , renowned for their clear & elegant design solutions, have updated their website. Packed with consistent product shots of old and new work and apparently some previously unseen Unit Editions Books. The responsive website makes use of some lovely subtle features like scrolling through images on mouse-over and a visible breadcrumb trail that opens up a sidebar menu.




next

Comic Sans for Cancer

Comic Sans for Cancer is an exhibition of posters inspired by the 20th anniversary of Comic Sans (the font we all love to hate) with proceeds going to Cancer Research UK.

We caught up with the exhibition’s curators Chris Flack, Renee Quigley and Jenny Theolin to find out what the hell they were thinking.

Why Comic Sans? For the love of God, why?! Please explain yourselves. We are sorry… I’m sure you wished it was ‘Helvetica against Hernias’ or ‘Gotham for Gonorrhea’  but alas that would probably be to easy. This was meant to be a challenge. If a designer can make Comic Sans look good then they can do anything.

Seriously we noticed that no one was celebrating the 20th anniversary of Comic Sans. Everyone had celebrated Helvetica’s 50th birthday but on one seemed to be celebrate the most ‘talked about font in the world’ 20th birthday.  

As designers & friends we wanted to do a project with a difference – which is how Comic Sans for Cancer started. We all know people who have been affected by cancer, so we decided we wanted to do something that was fun and quirky to raise money for Cancer research while at the same time celebrate the 20th year of Comic Sans. 

Everyone love to hate Comic Sans. So why not take the font the everyone loves to hate and put it to good use. As a designer I despise Comic Sans and thats the fun of it. Using something that’s perceived as being a little bit unloved for good and plus “Comic Sans for Cancer” just has a good ring to it. 

We really wanted the project to be fun and not take itself too seriously. “This may be the first time we publicly admit to having used Comic Sans. We apologise in advance to the design gods for the design sins we are about to commit. Please have mercy on our souls.”

9 out of ten people have heard of Comic Sans. So there is a lot of public interest in it and everyone seems to have a view or it (good or bad). As Vincent Connare said “If you love it, you don’t know much about typography and if you hate it, you really don’t know much about typography, either”.

And it feels like its the right time for Comic Sans to make its come back. and we thought it would be quite fun to have Vincent Connare and Ban Comic Sans posters in the same room.

You’ve had over 500 submissions. Was it difficult creating a shortlist to exhibit? How did you chose? (surely they all look awful!?)

It was one of the hardest shortlist to ever make, since all the entries were worthy to be in the exhibition. We’ve tried to create a selection that will turn heads, evoke debate, make us laugh and/or are also just pretty to look at. We spent an afternoon going through each entry on a projector, and if the submission got 2+ votes, it went through to the next round. Bit like Designer X-Factor. Can’t wait for everyone to see them all!

Can you tell us about the show? What can we expect? You know the ‘guy’ nobody likes but everyone knows throws a killer party? Comic Sans is this guy. Without giving much away, we are celebrating a birthday here remember, so expect the best birthday party in the arts community. 

There will be a huge selection of both heartfelt/serious and humorous/silly posters – ensuring there’s something for everyone. Expect giant installations, ironic little things, and of course the proof of the blood, sweat and tears from the artists who designed against their morals to raise money for Cancer Research Uk.

Anything you’d like to add? Come with an open mind, designers sold their souls for this for a good cause There are few chances in the design community to come together, have a bit of fun and raise money. This was a fairly open brief and we can’t wait to see everyones reactions to this truly global selection of work. Come along, have a laugh, donate, and spread the word.

Exhibition is at The Proud Archivist from Aug 20th – 24th 2014. A limited number of posters will be available to purchase at the exhibition and online.



next

Christophe Thockler – Lusine

Needlework and music videos aren’t two words you’d often see in the same sentence, however as we showed last year Nancy-based director and designer Christophe Thockler can find beauty and drama in the mundane.

Christophe has been in touch again, this time presenting his new music video for Seattle-based electro ambient artist called Lusine. Created for the single Arterial released on Ghostly International, Lusine wanted something blood related. Christophe took that fairly open brief and created something he calls “electrorganic” mixing computer chips, leds, screens, to emphasize the cold sounds, and blood to represent the more delicate warm layers of sound.

The final stop motion video was created using 7,000 photos, 15kg of electrical components from old tvs, phones and computers, 5 litres of blood. Christophe wanted to make something 100% real deciding to employ no digital effects in the making of the video – even the end credits are done with a glitching computer.



next

Bardo

Melbourne-based Bardo have been in touch to share some of their recent projects. Run by directors Luis Vialeand and Brenda Imboden, in collaboration with a close-nit network of freelancers, the studio has been producing some lovely work, such as branding for artisan meat company Zamora, and an installation for Polar illustrating climate change’s affects on the arctic poles.



next

D&AD Next Director Award

Today D&AD are announcing the first shortlist for the Next Director Award – a brand new short film award in partnership with YouTube.

16 aspiring filmmakers are in the running for the first award, which follows a different format and exists separately to the D&AD Professional Awards. It is judged three times per year, producing three separate shortlists, which are then in contention for the overall prize. The overall winner will announced at the Professional Awards Ceremony in May 2015. Are you an aspiring film-maker? Then the entry deadline for the second shortlist will be October 15.

Alison Lomax, Head of Creative Agency Partnerships, YouTube commented,

“I was blown away by the high level talent and variety of films across branded content, music videos and documentaries. A true reflection of the calibre of this next generation of filmmakers on YouTube.”

The first shortlist has a really nice mix of films; everything from animation, to documentaries to music videos and commercials, selected by a panel of top directors including Dougal Wilson, David Bruno, Laura Gregory, Ringan Ledwige, and Juliette Larthe.

We’ve selected some of our favourites below, you can view the entire shortlist here.

Walking Contest, a short film directed by Vania Heymann

Mr Flash: ‘Midnight Blue’, a music video directed by PENSACOLA

GAWDS, a documentary directed by Christine Yuan

Living Moments, branded content directed by Paul Trillo



Supported by

Recent features

View all features

Topics

Recent Jobs

+ Add a job to this list

Designer(s)

Thirdperson, Harpenden, Hertfordshire
out

Designer (s)

Modern Designers, United Kingdom
out

Mid-Senior Graphic Designer

Purple Creative Agency, Clerkenwell, London
out

Creative Director

Stinkdigital, NYC
out

Junior Designer

BBH ZAG, London
out

Design Internship

Bloodybigspider, London
out

Designer – 2–3 years experience

Hudson Fuggle, London, UK
out

Chatter

Love it!

Matt on Live the language

Paul is Mr Paper all right, what he doesn’t know about GF Smith’s ranges you could write on the back of a postage stamp. I have known Paul for many years and his enthusiasm and passion for the company he …

Harry G Hoy on GF Smith—website update
Luke Tonge

Not sure how I missed this, it’s great!

Luke Tonge on Less Than Jake – Do The Math

Very nice print. Kinda reminds me of the NVA Speed of Light logo which I also really liked.

petemandotnet on There is a light

“Morrissey / Marr composition” a.k.a. The Smiths FFS

Simon on There is a light

WOW! beautiful work, animation, illustration, ideas and all!

danashimoni on Less Than Jake – Do The Math

Playlist