FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1498 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1175 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 67 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 318 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 124 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 69 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 24 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 15 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 4 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

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Graphic Design Festival Scotland (GDFS)

Graphic Design Festival Scotland (GDFS) is an all new programme of workshops, competitions, talks, exhibitions, urban murals and live stream discussions, taking place between 22nd-26th of October with exhibitions running before, after and throughout.

Created and organised by Beth Wilson and James Gilchrist of Glasgow based Warriors Studio, the events are participation-based and aim to inspire young designers through active engagement. Our goal is to promote networking, creativity, learning, collaboration, friendly competition and importantly, to have fun.

The workshops will be centred around creative processes; conceptual thinking, visual communication and professional practice. We want to offer opportunities to develop creative problem solving skills and challenge ways of thinking through design-based projects and conceptual arts. There is an impressive list of workshop leaders and competition mentors on board including the likes of Anthony Burrill, Hort, Kesselskramer, Design Büro Frankfurt, 44 Flavours, Freytag Anderson, OK-RM, Recoat, Risotto Studio, Graphical HouseTouch, MadeBrave and O-Street.

If that wasn’t enough they are also running the GDFS International Poster Competition to encourage people to showcase and celebrate a broad selection of poster design from across the world, with a selection of entrants being exhibited during the festival at ‘In Public Gallery’ – Glasgow, Scotland. For submission details visit here.

Full a full list of programme events, poster competition information and how you can get involved visit the GDFS site or follow announcements and updates @GDFScotland



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Webydo Launches Its Code-Free Parallax Scrolling Animator

Parallax scrolling has been making headlines in our industry for a couple of years now. Even big influencers have made advances in parallax scrolling animator, one of the most impressive and original of these being Webydo, which has recently added the Parallax Scrolling Animator to its code-free design suite. Readers of FFF can be among the first to create a parallax scrolling site with Webydo’s code-free design studio. Simply head over to Webydo and sign up for an account so that you too can create a code-free parallax site.

Once you sign up for Webydo’s invitation, make sure that you read through the tips below for parallax scrolling so that you can properly implement the maximum effect for the most impact.

What is Parallax Scrolling?

Parallax scrolling has been around since the 1980s in 2D video games when the forefront graphics moved at a different speed than the background. In web design, parallax scrolling works a lot like video games in that different elements on the page move at different speeds. This creates a 3D effect and adds depth and interest to a website.

The problem now is that parallax scrolling has been both overdone and done badly, which means that some designers are shying away from the effect. And often, parallax sites include issues in site speed, mobile use, SEO, and usability. With these considerations in mind, has the parallax scrolling trend run its course?

Actually, many would argue that parallax is here to stay, rather than just a passing fad. As with most trends, there are solutions to the problems it initially has shown, as Zack Rutherford points out in his UX Magazine article. Parallax can provide a useful tool in creating ”wow factor” and allowing designers to stretch their legs creatively. Webydo made parallax available to its users exactly for these reasons.

How can Parallax boost professional website design?

Let’s face it – parallax scrolling just looks cool. It keeps users engaged, provides an interactive feel to a design, and overall keeps visitors on a page longer, which in turn can increase conversions.

Unleashed Technologies describes parallax scrolling as a technique that takes “the user experience to a new interactive level of online viewing.” Used in a story-like layout, parallax is a solution for web designers in creating websites that are more appealing to visitors.

Examples of Parallax.

The Sony store website shows just how creative you can get with parallax scrolling. When you create a parallax scrolling site with Webydo’s professional design studio, keep in mind the techniques used on the Sony Be Moved page. It begins with an introduction to the story of their company, and as viewers scroll down through the site, the story unfolds via parallax.

While scrolling, the parts of a Sony product “float” together to show how the technology came to be. The interesting part is that one funky part is thrown in, such as the lollipop mixed in with the parts that make up Sony’s mobile phone camera lens attachment. Users can click the + button to read interesting tidbits. It’s little extras like these that really make a site unique.

Site speed and mobile problems.

Two negatives of parallax involve mobile compatibility and site speed. Fortunately, Webydo’s parallax animator is optimized for quick load speed and mobile compatibility, so users don’t have to worry about these aspects.

And Sony shows another way that designers can further speed up a website: it does not try to keep all of the content on a single page. Its menu at the top of the page leads to product pages, an easy aspect Webydo users can also implement.

SEO and usability problems.

Two more complaints of parallax scrolling designs are poor SEO and usability. SEO problems are usually due to designers simply leaving this consideration out of a design, which is why Webydo makes it easy to include important SEO factors like meta-tags.

To avoid usability issues, simply use Webydo’s advanced design suite to add in factors such as chapter buttons. Sony kept the buttons inconspicuous – descriptions only pop open when users hover the mouse over each chapter button.

Is it just a fad or here to stay?

The difference between a fad and trend is that a fad passes quickly but a trend remains for more than just a season. Parallax Scrolling has been in web design for a while now, which is a good indicator that it’s here to stay.

It is true that parallax is an intimidating design style to learn, especially with no code experience. But this is why so many designers are taking up the chance to create their clients websites with Webydo’s code-free parallax scrolling animator. One designer even created a Game of Thrones teaser site for “Death Is Coming”. Now the possibilities are limitless, so you can create your site today with Webydo and join the growing community of 95K professional designers around the world who designing with Webydo.

This article is presented by Webydo’s community of professional designers.




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The Lion City – Time-Laps & Tilt-Shift Film

Tilt-shift photography is always great fun to look at, with the resulting toy-like-feeling giving a fresh perspective to the subject.

Over the last couple of years we’ve begun seeing some tilt-shift in motion with, beautiful time-lapse films of New York, Melbourne and Singapore. Although all three are impressive it’s the latter which really blew us away.

Shot by tilt-shift specialist Keith Loutit, the film uses an innovative post-production technique which we feel sets it apart from the competition.

Speaking with Planet5d, Keith explains:

“Because its the first time I’ve released in this style, the film is hard hitting, and full of effects… more so than if I were releasing a story based concept. Many of the scenes are not really tilt shift.. they’re what I call ‘clean shocks’, or ’tilt shocks’, depending on whether I choose to keep the tilt shift effect, and these are the focus of most of my experiments now going forward.”

However The Lion City was produced, the end result is visually stunning must-see look at Singapore.



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FFFootball – Simon Mooney Interview

A pretty amazing World Cup is just about to draw to a close, so therefore we are coming to the end of our FFFootball posts.

But before we do, we managed to catch up with photographer Simon Mooney. Simon has shot many different subjects over the years, but football has remained at the centre of his work. He has been behind the scenes with the England squad, shot campaigns and documentary shots for Spurs and Fulham, as well as shooting for the likes of Umbro and The Sun. So we thought he was the ideal photographer to have a football based chat with. So we did, and we found it really interesting.

Hi Simon. As you might be aware, we’ve been featuring a lot of World Cup and football posts on FormFiftyFive recently. Obviously your portfolio of work isn’t just related to football and sports, but it is a subject you’ve shot a lot of. So how did you end up shooting this subject matter?

I’ve always played football and been fascinated by certain aspects of the game. In the early 90s I was an art director in a Leeds advertising agency just starting to take pictures. I love newspapers and particularly admired David Ashdown’s sports pictures in The Independent – they really inspired me but getting a Premier league license is difficult so I learned to shoot sport at my own amateur club – Overthorpe SC in West Yorkshire – on crutches as I recovered from a ruptured cruciate ligament.

“Rio Ferdinand in the hotel massage room on the morning of the quarter-final against Brazil. It was the first game I got pictures from the dressing room.”

Read more




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Model mother tongue: Ola Rudnicka

“I hear hissing, rustling and hushing, and my ears are bleeding…” ~ Oscar Wilde on Polish language

Oscar wasn’t a fan of Polish, but then he didn’t have model Ola Rudnicka teaching him the finer points of the language. This beautifully shot video for ID Magazine with art direction from Robert Serek (who has created sets for Chanel and Stella McCartney) sees Ola – with mother tongue firmly in cheek – teach us handy phrases such as “W Szczebrzeszynie chrzaszcz brzmi w trzcinie” – A bug is buzzing in the reeds.

With art direction from Robert Serek, who has created sets for Chanel and Stella McCartney, the icy blue-toned video sees Ola enunciate key phrases in Polish amidst a stark white graphic set.

Check it out.



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Paula Scher Launches First Online Design Class

Yesterday online learning community Skillshare launched an online design class with Pentagram partner Paula Scher.

Known for her award-winning work designing brand identities for organizations like The Public Theater, Citibank, The Museum of Modern Art and The Philadelphia Museum of Art, her first online class is entitled Brand Identity: Design Adaptable Branding Systems.

The 70 minute class is broken into 10 lessons, where students will research an organization’s goals, develop a series of design solutions, simplify them to their essence, and stretch them to their limits across animation, products, signage, architecture, and more. Scher hopes her class will inspire designers at all levels, all around the world, to think creatively about brand identity.

Enrolment for the class is now open at Skillshare. A free one week trial is available to try out the lessons, thereafter it’s $10 per month for access to all of Skillshare’s classes, which cover design, film & video, photography and fashion.



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Game of Thrones, Season 4 – VFX making of reel

G.R.R Martin, The Lanisters, Starks, Targaryens, Baratheons and Greyjoys are all names that millions of Game of Thrones fans will be familiar with. Two more unsung heroes of the series are Jörn Großhans and Katharina Kessler, the Visual Effects Supervisor and Visual Effects Producer respectively.

Working for Stuttgart VFX studio Mackevision, Jörn and Katharina have been helping to bring Martin’s epic series to life, by subtly realising the worlds of Westeros and beyond. Check out their ‘making of showreel’ to see some digital magic in action.



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LEGO: Everything is NOT awesome

Following last week’s Greenpeace campaign urging toymaker LEGO to honour it’s environmental commitment and stop selling Shell branded bricks, creative agency Don’t Panic have produced this withering video to promote the movement.

Beginning with beautifully shot scenes of Arctic animals and Inuits, set to a serene soundtrack, proclaiming “everything is awesome” the movie starts of pleasantly. The mood begins to change when Shell-branded toys make an appearance. Overseen by a cigar-puffing fat-cat, drilling begins and the entire landscape is quickly enveloped by slick, black oil.

Over the next minute, we watch various wildlife, Inuits, huskies, children, and even Vikings and Santa consumed by the slick.

Greenpeace hammer home their point in the films endframes, stating “Shell is polluting our kids’ imaginations… tell Lego to end its partnership with Shell”.

For anyone interested in supporting the campaign, you can sign the petition and share the video.



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FFFootball — Cog World Cup

Whether you love it or loathe it, you can’t avoid the FIFA World Cup coming back every fourth summer. London agency Cog Design have chosen to embrace the occasion by inviting clients, peers and other members of the design community to join in their 2014 sweepstake (including us).

“We know that the World Cup isn’t a big occasion for many of our clients, so our challenge was to do something creative enough to engage the non-football fans amongst them as much as the ones that would be following the competition anyway.”

Rather than simply allocating their entrants to a nation and forgetting all about it until the final in July, Cog have created their own competition to run in parallel with the main event. In ‘Cog’s sweepstake the organisations involved are referred to as ‘teams’ in themselves, and an overarching early-twentieth-century aesthetic has been created to give the competition it’s own look and feel.

A cursory glance at the in-game Twitter commentary or fixtures & results posted on the , national teams appear to have been disregarded entirely – a closer look at the series of short, black & white films on Cog’s account reveal the draw and team allocation ‘as it happened’ – selecting numbered balls from a velvet bag and chalking-up the pairings on to a board – all to a catchy, Brazilian soundtrack.

32 ‘collectable captain cards’ were introduced during the draw to form the key visual hook of the campaign. Reminiscent of early cigarette cards, they include all of the period features you’d expect – hand painted kits, graduated background tints and, of course, a de-saturated mug-shot of the ‘player’. Some are even embellished with outrageous hairstyles, beards and ‘taches, based on infamous styles of players past and present. A ‘reverse-side’ to the cards also feature on the , profiling the entrant in a light-hearted, football-related manner. Cog have also used ‘referee cards’ throughout the campaign, as a way of introducing their team members to the project.

“We ran a similar sweepstake for the 2010 World Cup, and it proved to be very popular. We’ve really expanded on what we did four-years ago, the introduction of lots of hand-rendered elements have added a real charm to the project, and the period-style does a great job of making it all feel different to the coverage of the ‘real’ competition that will saturate the market elsewhere.”

Additional to the prize for overall winner, a spinkling of others are keeping everyone interested – there’s a spot the ball competition, best goal celebration and a prize for the most ‘supporters’ who can join by clicking a button on the appropriate profile page. Cog have even started to allocate the knocked-out ‘captains’ to the ones that are still in the competition, keen to keep as many players as possible still in the running.



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Registration Summer School is now open!

Roll up! Roll up! South London’s Registration Summer School is now open!

Three days of design lead workshops, lectures, performances and social activities from a selection of design professionals including Sebastian Zimmerhackl and Anthony Burrill alongside the brilliant Hato Press Studio.

Set in a disused primary school, in the Borough of Lewisham Registration is out to deliver experiential education methods that seek to give insight and inspire students. I chatted to Ross Bennett, one of the brains behind the programme to find a little bit more about what’s going on;

How did you come around to putting together Registration?

A friend and recent graduate (Callum Copley) approached myself (Ross Bennett) and Andrew Thorpe, designers who live in South London – with an idea for a summer school. Callum had been to a few different programmes over seas, like ‘After School Club’ in Offenbach, Germany.

Eike König From the studio ‘Hort’ and students from the Offenbach University ran the event in together as a joint project. Callum had a great time and found the collaboration between students and practitioners on such a non-hierarchical level really inspiring. Being surrounded by so many talented students in such short period of time (3 days) and being asked to produce work is an amazing experience.

There wasn’t really anything offering the same kind of fun, free educational structure that we thought there should be over here. So we’re making it happen.

Who should be looking to apply?

You should be interested in approaching subjects from all angles, researching and be open to creative briefs. We don’t want to limit it to Art and design students. But it will probably be past, present or future students that look to get involved in a fun project to challenge their notions of practice.

We want to cultivate a group of multi-practice individuals. We’ll try to make the selected group of students as diverse as possible so that they get the most from each other as well as from the guests that will be delivering workshops, and lectures.

Why the subject of Fear?

After a lot of discussion around whether or not there should be a theme and what it should be we thought it would help the practitioners we were inviting to work from a topic.

As Callum was a recent graduate and as myself and Andrew know only too well University is riddled with fear, just about every human being out there has their share of fears. Be they daily and trivial, or a severe disorder. We feel that fear as a topic isn’t that widely discussed within art and design, especially within education and practice.

We want to open up the theme discuss it without being afraid and maybe think about ways that we can suffer less from it and create work out of it. Across the 3 days and with such a breadth of guests we hope that the theme will be approached from many different perspectives.

What’s in the pipeline for future Registrations?

It’s very easy to start thinking too far into future before things have happened but it would be nice to keep ourselves open to the possibilities of a developed and new programme hopefully with the new network of people we form from this first registration.

It would be great to take on residencies in unused schools during their summer breaks. And definitely to keep working on projects that open up alternative education methods and maintain an element of fun and remain social at their core.

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Registration Summer School - Open from the 19th to the 21st of August

Find more on Registration at: www.registrationschool.co.uk



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INTERVIEW — MINISTRY

Ministry is a design and art direction studio based in Monterrey, Mexico. They produce bold design that functions cross-platform and focuses on product design, printed matter and digital design in close collaboration with people and organizations from around the world. The studio’s culture is firmly rooted in the rich tradition of graphic design and honors it by promoting this discipline into our local context.

Hello, can you start by tell us about the studio and the team behind Ministry?

Ministry is a design studio that works on branding, editorial, print and digital design projects that was founded in October of 2011. The studio’s core team is made up of its three partners André Mooij who is the Creative Director, Adrián García Chereti the Executive Director and José Antonio Domínguez the Art Director, accompanied by our designer Betty Ramones, our seasonal interns and a range of collaborators who work within other disciplines like industrial and interior design and web development.

What was the motivation on starting your studio?

The main motivation behind the founding of the studio was the simple desire of becoming independent, the three of us aren’t really that good at working in other companies, we don’t mean it in like a punk-anarchist way or anything, it’s more of a creative freedom kind of thing, we feel we work better when our core-philosophy is present in our creative process rather than adopting a different methodology one could find in other design studios.

Where do you find inspiration? What influences your work?

While the three of us have things in common, we do differ a bit when it comes to our influences, José is quite inspired by illustrative typography, documentary photography, minimalist grids, progressive rock and jazz, Adrián by video games, alternative music and the feminine aesthetic (however weird that might sound) and André is influenced by political movements, electronic music, dark humor, modernism and Japanese culture. So really, when it comes down to it, it’s a whole pool of influences.

Read more



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Coming Soon

Soon is a Belgian studio, based in Wetteren, who specialise in visual identities. What really stands out about their work is the focus put into hand-crafting each project. Whether chalk-illustrating a wall, hand-building a typographic model of GENT city or creating enormous infographics from thread (only viewable from thirty meters above), virtually all of Soon’s work has an impressive foundation in the hand-made.

To view more about each project check out Soon’s Behance.



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Gerry Judah: Goodwood Sculptures

Calcutta-born, London-based artist and designer Gerry Judah has been delighting visitors to the Goodwood Festival of Speed with iconic and gravity-defying sculptures since 1997. Every year I look forward to seeing what he’s produced, and this around it’s a 26 metre high, 45 metre long, 160-tonne parabola steel arch celebrating 120 years of Mercedez Benz motorsport. The sculpture features two speedsters travelling in opposite directions. Engineering by Capita, production by Littlehampton Welding. Check out the making of video then look back at previous years centrepieces, all available to view on the site here.



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